When all seems lost: management of refractory constipation—Surgery, rectal irrigation, percutaneous endoscopic colostomy, and more

V. Wilkinson-Smith, Adil Eddie Bharucha, A. Emmanuel, C. Knowles, Y. Yiannakou, M. Corsetti

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While the pharmacological armamentarium for chronic constipation has expanded over the past few years, a substantial proportion of constipated patients do not respond to these medications. This review summarizes the pharmacological and behavioral options for managing constipation and details the management of refractory constipation. Refractory constipation is defined as an inadequate improvement in constipation symptoms evaluated with an objective scale despite adequate therapy (ie, pharmacological and/or behavioral) that is based on the underlying pathophysiology of constipation. Minimally invasive (ie, rectal irrigation and percutaneous endoscopic colostomy) and surgical therapies are used to manage refractory constipation. This review appraises these options, and in particular, percutaneous endoscopic colostomy, which as detailed by an article in this issue, is a less invasive option for managing refractory constipation than surgery. While these options benefit some patients, the evidence of the risk: benefit profile for these therapies is limited.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere13352
JournalNeurogastroenterology and Motility
Volume30
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2018

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Colostomy
Constipation
Pharmacology
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • PEC
  • rectal irrigation
  • refractory constipation
  • surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Endocrine and Autonomic Systems
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

When all seems lost : management of refractory constipation—Surgery, rectal irrigation, percutaneous endoscopic colostomy, and more. / Wilkinson-Smith, V.; Bharucha, Adil Eddie; Emmanuel, A.; Knowles, C.; Yiannakou, Y.; Corsetti, M.

In: Neurogastroenterology and Motility, Vol. 30, No. 5, e13352, 01.05.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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