What does the measurement of whole-body fatty acid rate of appearance in plasma by using a fatty acid tracer really mean?

Bettina Mittendorfer, Olivia Liem, Bruce W. Patterson, John M. Miles, Samuel Klein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We evaluated the validity of using a single fatty acid tracer to assess total plasma long-chain free fatty acid (FFA) kinetics and the relationship between the rate of appearance (R a) of fatty acids in plasma and the fatty acid composition of adipose tissue triglyceride (TG). A mixture of [ 13C]-labeled myristate, palmitate, stearate, oleate, and linoleate was infused in healthy men during basal conditions and during conditions that stimulate (epinephrine infusion) and inhibit (insulin infusion) lipolysis of adipose tissue TGs. Calculated total FFA, R a based on palmitate, oleate, or linoleate tracers, was within 15% of the measured sum of the individual fatty acid R a under all conditions, whereas stearate and myristate tracers consistently underestimated and over-estimated total FFA R a, respectively. The fatty acid R a profile closely matched the fatty acid profile of subcutaneous adipose tissue TGs during epinephrine infusion, but not during basal conditions and insulin infusion. Our data support the common practice of using labeled palmitate or oleate as fatty acid tracers for assessing total plasma FFA kinetics and suggest that a source of lipids other than adipose tissue TG release fatty acids into the systemic circulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1641-1648
Number of pages8
JournalDiabetes
Volume52
Issue number7
StatePublished - Jul 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Fatty Acids
Nonesterified Fatty Acids
Palmitates
Oleic Acid
Adipose Tissue
Stearates
Myristic Acid
Linoleic Acid
Epinephrine
Triglycerides
Insulin
Lipolysis
Subcutaneous Fat
Lipids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Mittendorfer, B., Liem, O., Patterson, B. W., Miles, J. M., & Klein, S. (2003). What does the measurement of whole-body fatty acid rate of appearance in plasma by using a fatty acid tracer really mean? Diabetes, 52(7), 1641-1648.

What does the measurement of whole-body fatty acid rate of appearance in plasma by using a fatty acid tracer really mean? / Mittendorfer, Bettina; Liem, Olivia; Patterson, Bruce W.; Miles, John M.; Klein, Samuel.

In: Diabetes, Vol. 52, No. 7, 01.07.2003, p. 1641-1648.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mittendorfer, B, Liem, O, Patterson, BW, Miles, JM & Klein, S 2003, 'What does the measurement of whole-body fatty acid rate of appearance in plasma by using a fatty acid tracer really mean?', Diabetes, vol. 52, no. 7, pp. 1641-1648.
Mittendorfer B, Liem O, Patterson BW, Miles JM, Klein S. What does the measurement of whole-body fatty acid rate of appearance in plasma by using a fatty acid tracer really mean? Diabetes. 2003 Jul 1;52(7):1641-1648.
Mittendorfer, Bettina ; Liem, Olivia ; Patterson, Bruce W. ; Miles, John M. ; Klein, Samuel. / What does the measurement of whole-body fatty acid rate of appearance in plasma by using a fatty acid tracer really mean?. In: Diabetes. 2003 ; Vol. 52, No. 7. pp. 1641-1648.
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