Visual dependency and dizziness after vestibular neuritis

Sian Cousins, Nicholas J. Cutfield, Diego Kaski, Antonella Palla, Barry M. Seemungal, John F. Golding, Jeffrey P Staab, Adolfo M. Bronstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

55 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Symptomatic recovery after acute vestibular neuritis (VN) is variable, with around 50% of patients reporting long term vestibular symptoms; hence, it is essential to identify factors related to poor clinical outcome. Here we investigated whether excessive reliance on visual input for spatial orientation (visual dependence) was associated with long term vestibular symptoms following acute VN. Twenty-eight patients with VN and 25 normal control subjects were included. Patients were enrolled at least 6 months after acute illness. Recovery status was not a criterion for study entry, allowing recruitment of patients with a full range of persistent symptoms. We measured visual dependence with a laptop-based Rod-and-Disk Test and severity of symptoms with the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI). The third of patients showing the worst clinical outcomes (mean DHI score 36-80) had significantly greater visual dependence than normal subjects (6.35u error vs. 3.39u respectively, p = 0.03). Asymptomatic patients and those with minor residual symptoms did not differ from controls. Visual dependence was associated with high levels of persistent vestibular symptoms after acute VN. Over-reliance on visual information for spatial orientation is one characteristic of poorly recovered vestibular neuritis patients. The finding may be clinically useful given that visual dependence may be modified through rehabilitation desensitization techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere105426
JournalPLoS One
Volume9
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 18 2014

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Vestibular Neuronitis
Dizziness
signs and symptoms (animals and humans)
Recovery
Patient rehabilitation
Equipment and Supplies
Patient Selection
Rehabilitation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Cousins, S., Cutfield, N. J., Kaski, D., Palla, A., Seemungal, B. M., Golding, J. F., ... Bronstein, A. M. (2014). Visual dependency and dizziness after vestibular neuritis. PLoS One, 9(9), [e105426]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0105426

Visual dependency and dizziness after vestibular neuritis. / Cousins, Sian; Cutfield, Nicholas J.; Kaski, Diego; Palla, Antonella; Seemungal, Barry M.; Golding, John F.; Staab, Jeffrey P; Bronstein, Adolfo M.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 9, No. 9, e105426, 18.09.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cousins, S, Cutfield, NJ, Kaski, D, Palla, A, Seemungal, BM, Golding, JF, Staab, JP & Bronstein, AM 2014, 'Visual dependency and dizziness after vestibular neuritis', PLoS One, vol. 9, no. 9, e105426. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0105426
Cousins S, Cutfield NJ, Kaski D, Palla A, Seemungal BM, Golding JF et al. Visual dependency and dizziness after vestibular neuritis. PLoS One. 2014 Sep 18;9(9). e105426. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0105426
Cousins, Sian ; Cutfield, Nicholas J. ; Kaski, Diego ; Palla, Antonella ; Seemungal, Barry M. ; Golding, John F. ; Staab, Jeffrey P ; Bronstein, Adolfo M. / Visual dependency and dizziness after vestibular neuritis. In: PLoS One. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 9.
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