Viscoelastic properties of the human colon

Adil Eddie Bharucha, Rolf D. Hubmayr, Irene J. Ferber, Alan R. Zinsmeister

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Our objectives were to characterize colonic viscoelastic properties of the human descending colon by assessing pressure-volume (P-V) relationships during barostatic balloon distension. In 16 healthy subjects, a balloon was inflated to 44 mmHg and then deflated to 0 mmHg in 4-mmHg steps at 10, 30, and 60 ml/min, allowing volume fluctuations to stabilize at each pressure increment. Thereafter, these "quasi-static" P-V curves were compared with "dynamic" distensions to 300 ml, at 1 and 10 ml/s, before and after intravenous atropine in another five subjects. During quasi-static curves, balloon volume stabilized at each pressure increment. Quasi-static P-V curves were reproducible within individuals and approximated to a power exponential function and revealed hysteresis, indicative of viscoelasticity. Body mass index influenced quasi-static P-V curves during inflation but not during deflation. The colon was less compliant during dynamic distensions at 10 ml/s than during quasistatic distensions. Atropine increased quasi-static compliance and attenuated differences between quasi-static and rapid distensions. We conclude that colonic viscoelastic properties can be assessed by quasi-static P-V curves. Rapid colonic distension activated neural reflexes, thereby reducing colonic compliance compared with quasi-static distensions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
Volume281
Issue number2 44-2
StatePublished - 2001

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Colon
Pressure
Atropine
Compliance
Descending Colon
Economic Inflation
Reflex
Healthy Volunteers
Body Mass Index

Keywords

  • Atropine
  • Body mass index
  • Compliance
  • Hysteresis
  • Pressure-volume relationships

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Gastroenterology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Viscoelastic properties of the human colon. / Bharucha, Adil Eddie; Hubmayr, Rolf D.; Ferber, Irene J.; Zinsmeister, Alan R.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, Vol. 281, No. 2 44-2, 2001.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bharucha, Adil Eddie ; Hubmayr, Rolf D. ; Ferber, Irene J. ; Zinsmeister, Alan R. / Viscoelastic properties of the human colon. In: American Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology. 2001 ; Vol. 281, No. 2 44-2.
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