Vasculitis in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

A study of 32 patients and systematic review of the literature

Vasculitis Clinical Research Consortium(VCRC) and the Canadian Vasculitis Network(CanVasc)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Published small case series suggest that inflammatory bowel disease [IBD; Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC)] and vasculitis co-occur more frequently than would be expected by chance. Objectives: To describe this association by an analysis of a large cohort of carefully studied patients and through a systematic literature review. Methods: Patients with both IBD and vasculitis enrolled in the Vasculitis Clinical Research Consortium (VCRC) Longitudinal Studies, followed in Canadian Vasculitis research network (CanVasc) centers and/or in the University of Toronto's IBD clinic were included in this case series. A systematic literature review of patients with IBD and vasculitis involved a PubMed search through February 2014. The main characteristics of patients with Takayasu arteritis (TAK) and IBD were compared to those in patients with TAK without IBD followed in the VCRC. Results: The study identified 32 patients with IBD and vasculitis: 13 with large-vessel vasculitis [LVV; 12 with TAK, 1 with giant cell arteritis (GCA); 8 with CD, 5 with UC]; 8 with ANCA-associated vasculitis [AAV; 6 granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), 2 with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA)]; 5 with isolated cutaneous vasculitis; and 6 with other vasculitides. Patients with LVV and AAV were mostly female (18/21). The diagnosis of IBD preceded that of vasculitis in 12/13 patients with LVV and 8/8 patients with AAV. The review of the literature identified 306 patients with IBD and vasculitis: 144 with LVV (133 TAK; 87 with IBD preceding LVV), 19 with AAV [14 GPA, 1 EGPA, 4 microscopic polyangiitis (MPA)], 66 with isolated cutaneous vasculitis, and 77 with other vasculitides. Patients with IBD and TAK were younger and had more frequent headaches, constitutional symptoms, or gastrointestinal symptoms compared to those patients in the VCRC who had TAK without IBD. Conclusions: These findings highlight the risk of vasculitis, especially TAK, in patients with IBD (both CD and UC).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)475-482
Number of pages8
JournalSeminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism
Volume45
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Fingerprint

Vasculitis
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Takayasu Arteritis
Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis
Ulcerative Colitis
Crohn Disease
Research
Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-Associated Vasculitis
Microscopic Polyangiitis
Skin
Giant Cell Arteritis
PubMed
Headache
Longitudinal Studies

Keywords

  • Crohn's disease
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Takayasu arteritis
  • Ulcerative colitis
  • Vasculitis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

Vasculitis in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases : A study of 32 patients and systematic review of the literature. / Vasculitis Clinical Research Consortium(VCRC) and the Canadian Vasculitis Network(CanVasc).

In: Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism, Vol. 45, No. 4, 01.02.2016, p. 475-482.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vasculitis Clinical Research Consortium(VCRC) and the Canadian Vasculitis Network(CanVasc). / Vasculitis in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases : A study of 32 patients and systematic review of the literature. In: Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism. 2016 ; Vol. 45, No. 4. pp. 475-482.
@article{af256d014b5047478e0aa8c80fe91098,
title = "Vasculitis in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases: A study of 32 patients and systematic review of the literature",
abstract = "Background: Published small case series suggest that inflammatory bowel disease [IBD; Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC)] and vasculitis co-occur more frequently than would be expected by chance. Objectives: To describe this association by an analysis of a large cohort of carefully studied patients and through a systematic literature review. Methods: Patients with both IBD and vasculitis enrolled in the Vasculitis Clinical Research Consortium (VCRC) Longitudinal Studies, followed in Canadian Vasculitis research network (CanVasc) centers and/or in the University of Toronto's IBD clinic were included in this case series. A systematic literature review of patients with IBD and vasculitis involved a PubMed search through February 2014. The main characteristics of patients with Takayasu arteritis (TAK) and IBD were compared to those in patients with TAK without IBD followed in the VCRC. Results: The study identified 32 patients with IBD and vasculitis: 13 with large-vessel vasculitis [LVV; 12 with TAK, 1 with giant cell arteritis (GCA); 8 with CD, 5 with UC]; 8 with ANCA-associated vasculitis [AAV; 6 granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), 2 with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA)]; 5 with isolated cutaneous vasculitis; and 6 with other vasculitides. Patients with LVV and AAV were mostly female (18/21). The diagnosis of IBD preceded that of vasculitis in 12/13 patients with LVV and 8/8 patients with AAV. The review of the literature identified 306 patients with IBD and vasculitis: 144 with LVV (133 TAK; 87 with IBD preceding LVV), 19 with AAV [14 GPA, 1 EGPA, 4 microscopic polyangiitis (MPA)], 66 with isolated cutaneous vasculitis, and 77 with other vasculitides. Patients with IBD and TAK were younger and had more frequent headaches, constitutional symptoms, or gastrointestinal symptoms compared to those patients in the VCRC who had TAK without IBD. Conclusions: These findings highlight the risk of vasculitis, especially TAK, in patients with IBD (both CD and UC).",
keywords = "Crohn's disease, Inflammatory bowel disease, Takayasu arteritis, Ulcerative colitis, Vasculitis",
author = "{Vasculitis Clinical Research Consortium(VCRC) and the Canadian Vasculitis Network(CanVasc)} and Alice Sy and Nader Khalidi and Natasha Dehghan and Lillian Barra and Simon Carette and David Cuthbertson and Hoffman, {Gary S.} and Koening, {Curry L.} and Langford, {Carol A.} and Carol McAlear and Larry Moreland and Monach, {Paul A.} and Philip Seo and Ulrich Specks and Antoine Sreih and Ytterberg, {Steven R} and {Van Assche}, Gert and Merkel, {Peter A.} and Christian Pagnoux",
year = "2016",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.semarthrit.2015.07.006",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "45",
pages = "475--482",
journal = "Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism",
issn = "0049-0172",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Vasculitis in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases

T2 - A study of 32 patients and systematic review of the literature

AU - Vasculitis Clinical Research Consortium(VCRC) and the Canadian Vasculitis Network(CanVasc)

AU - Sy, Alice

AU - Khalidi, Nader

AU - Dehghan, Natasha

AU - Barra, Lillian

AU - Carette, Simon

AU - Cuthbertson, David

AU - Hoffman, Gary S.

AU - Koening, Curry L.

AU - Langford, Carol A.

AU - McAlear, Carol

AU - Moreland, Larry

AU - Monach, Paul A.

AU - Seo, Philip

AU - Specks, Ulrich

AU - Sreih, Antoine

AU - Ytterberg, Steven R

AU - Van Assche, Gert

AU - Merkel, Peter A.

AU - Pagnoux, Christian

PY - 2016/2/1

Y1 - 2016/2/1

N2 - Background: Published small case series suggest that inflammatory bowel disease [IBD; Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC)] and vasculitis co-occur more frequently than would be expected by chance. Objectives: To describe this association by an analysis of a large cohort of carefully studied patients and through a systematic literature review. Methods: Patients with both IBD and vasculitis enrolled in the Vasculitis Clinical Research Consortium (VCRC) Longitudinal Studies, followed in Canadian Vasculitis research network (CanVasc) centers and/or in the University of Toronto's IBD clinic were included in this case series. A systematic literature review of patients with IBD and vasculitis involved a PubMed search through February 2014. The main characteristics of patients with Takayasu arteritis (TAK) and IBD were compared to those in patients with TAK without IBD followed in the VCRC. Results: The study identified 32 patients with IBD and vasculitis: 13 with large-vessel vasculitis [LVV; 12 with TAK, 1 with giant cell arteritis (GCA); 8 with CD, 5 with UC]; 8 with ANCA-associated vasculitis [AAV; 6 granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), 2 with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA)]; 5 with isolated cutaneous vasculitis; and 6 with other vasculitides. Patients with LVV and AAV were mostly female (18/21). The diagnosis of IBD preceded that of vasculitis in 12/13 patients with LVV and 8/8 patients with AAV. The review of the literature identified 306 patients with IBD and vasculitis: 144 with LVV (133 TAK; 87 with IBD preceding LVV), 19 with AAV [14 GPA, 1 EGPA, 4 microscopic polyangiitis (MPA)], 66 with isolated cutaneous vasculitis, and 77 with other vasculitides. Patients with IBD and TAK were younger and had more frequent headaches, constitutional symptoms, or gastrointestinal symptoms compared to those patients in the VCRC who had TAK without IBD. Conclusions: These findings highlight the risk of vasculitis, especially TAK, in patients with IBD (both CD and UC).

AB - Background: Published small case series suggest that inflammatory bowel disease [IBD; Crohn's disease (CD) or ulcerative colitis (UC)] and vasculitis co-occur more frequently than would be expected by chance. Objectives: To describe this association by an analysis of a large cohort of carefully studied patients and through a systematic literature review. Methods: Patients with both IBD and vasculitis enrolled in the Vasculitis Clinical Research Consortium (VCRC) Longitudinal Studies, followed in Canadian Vasculitis research network (CanVasc) centers and/or in the University of Toronto's IBD clinic were included in this case series. A systematic literature review of patients with IBD and vasculitis involved a PubMed search through February 2014. The main characteristics of patients with Takayasu arteritis (TAK) and IBD were compared to those in patients with TAK without IBD followed in the VCRC. Results: The study identified 32 patients with IBD and vasculitis: 13 with large-vessel vasculitis [LVV; 12 with TAK, 1 with giant cell arteritis (GCA); 8 with CD, 5 with UC]; 8 with ANCA-associated vasculitis [AAV; 6 granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), 2 with eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (EGPA)]; 5 with isolated cutaneous vasculitis; and 6 with other vasculitides. Patients with LVV and AAV were mostly female (18/21). The diagnosis of IBD preceded that of vasculitis in 12/13 patients with LVV and 8/8 patients with AAV. The review of the literature identified 306 patients with IBD and vasculitis: 144 with LVV (133 TAK; 87 with IBD preceding LVV), 19 with AAV [14 GPA, 1 EGPA, 4 microscopic polyangiitis (MPA)], 66 with isolated cutaneous vasculitis, and 77 with other vasculitides. Patients with IBD and TAK were younger and had more frequent headaches, constitutional symptoms, or gastrointestinal symptoms compared to those patients in the VCRC who had TAK without IBD. Conclusions: These findings highlight the risk of vasculitis, especially TAK, in patients with IBD (both CD and UC).

KW - Crohn's disease

KW - Inflammatory bowel disease

KW - Takayasu arteritis

KW - Ulcerative colitis

KW - Vasculitis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84959535266&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84959535266&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.semarthrit.2015.07.006

DO - 10.1016/j.semarthrit.2015.07.006

M3 - Article

VL - 45

SP - 475

EP - 482

JO - Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism

JF - Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism

SN - 0049-0172

IS - 4

ER -