Validation of Pictorial Mood Assessment with Ottawa Mood Scales and the Positive and Negative Affect Scale for Young Adults

Mei Yi Wong, Paul E. Croarkin, Chen Kang Lee, Poh Foong Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Pictorial mood assessments reduce the barriers of age, culture, gender and language fluency in the course of psychiatric assessments. This study sought to validate the Ottawa Mood Scales, a pictorial form of mood assessment questionnaire among non-native English speaking young adults in Malaysia. Since the Ottawa Mood Scales has not been previously validated, the convergent validity of the Ottawa Mood Scales was measured against the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS), an established mood assessment instrument. A total of 129 young adults (aged 18–34) were recruited and completed an online survey with the Ottawa Mood Scales and PANAS questionnaires. Exploratory factor analysis indicated that the Ottawa Mood Scales has a one-dimensional structure and that a four-item model demonstrated higher reliability than the original 5-item model. Scores on the Ottawa Mood Scales items positively and significantly correlated with scores on the negative PANAS subscale, which supports the validity of the Ottawa Mood Scales in measuring the negative effect. The Cronbach’s α was.793 for the four-item model of the Ottawa Mood Scales indicating acceptable reliability in this Malaysian young adult sample. It was concluded that the Ottawa Mood Scales could have utility in assessing mood disorder symptoms in young adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCommunity Mental Health Journal
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • Emotion
  • Mood assessment
  • Psychological affect
  • Scale validation
  • Young adults

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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