Urinary tract infections in adults

Robert Orenstein, Edward S. Wong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

111 Scopus citations

Abstract

Urinary tract infections remain a significant cause of morbidity in all age groups. Recent studies have helped to better define the population groups at risk for these infections, as well as the most cost-effective management strategies. Initially, a urinary tract infection should be categorized as complicated or uncomplicated. Further categorization of the infection by clinical syndrome and by host (i.e., acute cystitis in young women, acute pyelonephritis, catheter-related infection, infection in men, asymptomatic bacteriuria in the elderly) helps the physician determine the appropriate diagnostic and management strategies. Uncomplicated urinary tract infections are caused by a predictable group of susceptible organisms. These infections can be empirically treated without the need for urine cultures. The most effective therapy for an uncomplicated infection is a three-day course of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Complicated infections are diagnosed by quantitative urine cultures and require a more prolonged course of therapy. Asymptomatic bacteriuria rarely requires treatment and is not associated with increased morbidity in elderly patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1225-1234
Number of pages10
JournalAmerican family physician
Volume59
Issue number5
StatePublished - Mar 1 1999

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

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  • Cite this

    Orenstein, R., & Wong, E. S. (1999). Urinary tract infections in adults. American family physician, 59(5), 1225-1234.