Ureteropelvic junction obstruction with concurrent renal pelvic calculi in the pediatric patient

A long-term followup

D. A. Husmann, D. S. Milliner, J. W. Segura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: We determined the long-term prognosis of the pediatric patient presenting with simultaneous ureteropelvic junction obstruction and a renal calculus. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed all individuals younger than 17 years who presented to our institutions with simultaneous ureteropelvic junction obstruction and an ipsilateral renal calculus. Results: Simultaneous ureteropelvic junction obstruction with nonstruvite calculi was present in 22 patients, while 6 had struvite calculi. Median age at diagnosis was 11 years (range 5 to 16). During a median followup of 9 years (range 2 to 38) renal calculi recurred in 19 patients (68%), including 10 (36%) with 1 and 9 (32%) with 2 or more recurrences. Median time to first stone recurrence was 11 years (range 2 to 38). Of the 22 patients with nonstruvite calculi 15 (68%) had recurrence. An identifiable metabolic etiology for renal lithiasis was found in 13 of these patients (87%). In contrast, only 2 of the 7 patients (29%) with nonstruvite calculi and no recurrent stones had an identifiable abnormality. This finding suggests that the presence of an identifiable metabolic abnormality significantly predisposes to recurrent nonstruvite renal lithiasis (p <0.01). Conclusions: Of the pediatric patients presenting with simultaneous ureteropelvic junction obstruction and a renal calculus 68% will have recurrent renal lithiasis. It remains to be determined whether active treatment of coexisting metabolic abnormalities could prevent or reduce the incidence of recurrent stone disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)741-743
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Urology
Volume156
Issue number2 SUPPL. 1
StatePublished - Aug 1996
Externally publishedYes

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Kidney Calculi
Pediatrics
Calculi
Lithiasis
Kidney
Recurrence
Incidence

Keywords

  • Calculi
  • Kidney
  • Ureter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Ureteropelvic junction obstruction with concurrent renal pelvic calculi in the pediatric patient : A long-term followup. / Husmann, D. A.; Milliner, D. S.; Segura, J. W.

In: Journal of Urology, Vol. 156, No. 2 SUPPL. 1, 08.1996, p. 741-743.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Husmann, D. A. ; Milliner, D. S. ; Segura, J. W. / Ureteropelvic junction obstruction with concurrent renal pelvic calculi in the pediatric patient : A long-term followup. In: Journal of Urology. 1996 ; Vol. 156, No. 2 SUPPL. 1. pp. 741-743.
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