Unruptured intracranial aneurysms: Epidemiology, natural history, management options, and familial screening

Robert D. Brown, Joseph P. Broderick

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

235 Scopus citations

Abstract

Intracranial saccular or berry aneurysms are common, occurring in about 1-2% of the population. Unruptured intracranial aneurysms are increasingly being detected as cross-sectional imaging techniques are used more frequently in clinical practice. Once an unruptured intracranial aneurysm is detected, decisions regarding optimum management are made on the basis of careful comparison of the short-term and long-term risks of aneurysmal rupture with the risk associated with the intervention, whether that be surgical clipping or endovascular management. Several factors need to be carefully considered, including aneurysm size and location, the patient's family history and medical history, and the availability of an interventional option that has an acceptable risk. The patient's knowledge that they have an unruptured intracranial aneurysm can lead to substantial stress and anxiety, and their perspective regarding treatment, after hearing an unbiased appraisal of the rupture risks and the risk of interventional treatment, is of the utmost importance. Controversy remains regarding optimum management, and thorough assessments of the risks and benefits of contemporary management options, specific to aneurysm size, location, and many other aneurysm and patient factors, are needed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)393-404
Number of pages12
JournalThe Lancet Neurology
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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