Uncemented acetabular components with bulk femoral head autograft for acetabular reconstruction in developmental dysplasia of the hip: Results at five to twelve years

M. J. Spangehl, D. J. Berry, R. T. Trousdale, M. E. Cabanela

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Abstract

Background: Anterolateral acetabular bone deficiency is one of the technical problems associated with total hip arthroplasty in patients with developmental hip dysplasia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of one method of acetabular reconstruction for hip dysplasia - placement of an uncemented socket in conjunction with a bulk femoral head autograft. Methods: Forty-four hips in thirty-five patients (twenty-nine female and six male; average age, thirty-nine years) with developmental hip dysplasia were treated with primary total hip arthroplasty with use of an uncemented porous-coated titanium cup fixed with screws and an autogenous bulk femoral head graft. The patients were followed clinically in a prospective fashion for five to 12.3 years (mean, 7.5 years), and radiographs were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Four acetabular components were revised: two, because of severe polyethylene wear and osteolysis; one, because of aseptic loosening; and one, because of fracture of the acetabular shell. The mean Harris hip score for the unrevised hips improved from 51 points preoperatively to 91 points postoperatively. No unrevised socket had definite radiographic evidence of loosening. Forty-three of the forty-four hips had no radiographic evidence of resorption of the graft or had radiographic evidence of resorption limited to the nonstressed area of the graft lateral to the edge of the cup. Conclusions: This method of reconstruction provided reliable acetabular fixation and appeared to restore acetabular bone stock in patients with developmental hip dysplasia. We use this technique for patients with moderate anterolateral acetabular bone deficiency requiring total hip arthroplasty.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1484-1489
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery - Series A
Volume83
Issue number10
StatePublished - 2001

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Hip Dislocation
Autografts
Thigh
Hip
Arthroplasty
Transplants
Bone and Bones
Osteolysis
Polyethylene
Titanium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Uncemented acetabular components with bulk femoral head autograft for acetabular reconstruction in developmental dysplasia of the hip : Results at five to twelve years. / Spangehl, M. J.; Berry, D. J.; Trousdale, R. T.; Cabanela, M. E.

In: Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery - Series A, Vol. 83, No. 10, 2001, p. 1484-1489.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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