Type i interferon in rheumatic diseases

Theresa L.Wampler Muskardin, Timothy B. Niewold

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The type I interferon pathway has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a number of rheumatic diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren syndrome, myositis, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. In normal immune responses, type I interferons have a critical role in the defence against viruses, yet in many rheumatic diseases, large subgroups of patients demonstrate persistent activation of the type I interferon pathway. Genetic variations in type I interferon-related genes are risk factors for some rheumatic diseases, and can explain some of the heterogeneity in type I interferon responses seen between patients within a given disease. Inappropriate activation of the immune response via Toll-like receptors and other nucleic acid sensors also contributes to the dysregulation of the type I interferon pathway in a number of rheumatic diseases. Theoretically, differences in type I interferon activity between patients might predict response to immune-based therapies, as has been demonstrated for rheumatoid arthritis. A number of type I interferon and type I interferon pathway blocking therapies are currently in clinical trials, the results of which are promising thus far. This Review provides an overview of the many ways in which the type I interferon system affects rheumatic diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)214-228
Number of pages15
JournalNature Reviews Rheumatology
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 21 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Interferon Type I
Rheumatic Diseases
Interferons
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Myositis
Systemic Scleroderma
Toll-Like Receptors
Systemic Lupus Erythematosus
Nucleic Acids
Clinical Trials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Type i interferon in rheumatic diseases. / Muskardin, Theresa L.Wampler; Niewold, Timothy B.

In: Nature Reviews Rheumatology, Vol. 14, No. 4, 21.03.2018, p. 214-228.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Muskardin, TLW & Niewold, TB 2018, 'Type i interferon in rheumatic diseases', Nature Reviews Rheumatology, vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 214-228. https://doi.org/10.1038/nrrheum.2018.31
Muskardin, Theresa L.Wampler ; Niewold, Timothy B. / Type i interferon in rheumatic diseases. In: Nature Reviews Rheumatology. 2018 ; Vol. 14, No. 4. pp. 214-228.
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