Type D personality is associated with increased prevalence of ventricular arrhythmias in community-residing persons without coronary heart disease

Gunnar Einvik, Toril Dammen, Silje K. Namtvedt, Harald Hrubos-Strøm, Anna Randby, Håvard A. Kristiansen, Inger H. Nordhus, Virend Somers, Torbjørn Omland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Type D personality may be a risk factor for poor outcome in patients with cardiovascular disease. The biological mechanisms underlying this association are poorly understood. The objective of the study was to test the hypotheses that Type D personality is associated with biological markers for sympathetic dysregulation. Design: Cross-sectional community-based study. Methods: Type D personality was evaluated by DS-14 in 450 persons (46% men), aged between 30 and 65 years. From a Holter-recording, (mean length 18.3 hours), long-term heart rate, ventricular arrhythmias, and heart rate variability (HRV) were registered as markers of sympathetic dysregulation. Traditional cardiovascular risk factors, apnoea- hypopnoea index, medication, and anxiety symptoms were adjusted for. Results: Type D persons had higher long-term averaged heart rate (74 vs. 71 beats/min, p=0.003), but this difference was attenuated and not significant in the multivariate model (p=0.078)). There was an increased prevalence of complex ventricular ectopy (bigeminy, trigeminy, or non-sustained ventricular tachycardia; 14 vs. 6%, p=0.005 in multivariate model). HRV indices did not differ significantly between those with or without Type D personality. Anxiety symptoms did not confound these associations. Conclusions: Type D personality is independently associated with a higher likelihood of ventricular arrhythmias, which may be implicated in the increased cardiovascular risk observed in persons with Type D personality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)592-600
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Preventive Cardiology
Volume21
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Type D Personality
Coronary Disease
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Heart Rate
Anxiety
Apnea
Ventricular Tachycardia
Cardiovascular Diseases
Biomarkers

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • heart rate variability
  • Type D personality
  • ventricular arrhythmia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Epidemiology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Type D personality is associated with increased prevalence of ventricular arrhythmias in community-residing persons without coronary heart disease. / Einvik, Gunnar; Dammen, Toril; Namtvedt, Silje K.; Hrubos-Strøm, Harald; Randby, Anna; Kristiansen, Håvard A.; Nordhus, Inger H.; Somers, Virend; Omland, Torbjørn.

In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Vol. 21, No. 5, 2014, p. 592-600.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Einvik, Gunnar ; Dammen, Toril ; Namtvedt, Silje K. ; Hrubos-Strøm, Harald ; Randby, Anna ; Kristiansen, Håvard A. ; Nordhus, Inger H. ; Somers, Virend ; Omland, Torbjørn. / Type D personality is associated with increased prevalence of ventricular arrhythmias in community-residing persons without coronary heart disease. In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. 2014 ; Vol. 21, No. 5. pp. 592-600.
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