Tumour angiogenesis: Hitting cancer where it hurts

Kavitha Sunassee, Richard Geoffrey Vile

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two recent studies that involve perturbing tumour blood supply provide new hope for anti-cancer therapies. The first uses elegant molecular engineering to achieve tumour-specific blood clots and the second reports the identification of a natural inhibitor, endostatin, which is produced from tumour extracellular matrix.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCurrent Biology
Volume7
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 1 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

angiogenesis
Tumors
neoplasms
Blood
Endostatins
Neoplasms
blood
extracellular matrix
Extracellular Matrix
engineering
Thrombosis
therapeutics
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Tumour angiogenesis : Hitting cancer where it hurts. / Sunassee, Kavitha; Vile, Richard Geoffrey.

In: Current Biology, Vol. 7, No. 5, 01.05.1997.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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