Trehalose upregulates progranulin expression in human and mouse models of GRN haploinsufficiency: A novel therapeutic lead to treat frontotemporal dementia

Christopher J. Holler, Georgia Taylor, Zachary T. McEachin, Qiudong Deng, William J. Watkins, Kathryn Hudson, Charles A. Easley, William T. Hu, Chadwick M. Hales, Wilfried Rossoll, Gary J. Bassell, Thomas Kukar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Progranulin (PGRN) is a secreted growth factor important for neuronal survival and may do so, in part, by regulating lysosome homeostasis. Mutations in the PGRN gene (GRN) are a common cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) and lead to disease through PGRN haploinsufficiency. Additionally, complete loss of PGRN in humans leads to neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL), a lysosomal storage disease. Importantly, Grn-/- mouse models recapitulate pathogenic lysosomal features of NCL. Further, GRN variants that decrease PGRN expression increase the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Together these findings demonstrate that insufficient PGRN predisposes neurons to degeneration. Therefore, compounds that increase PGRN levels are potential therapeutics for multiple neurodegenerative diseases. Results: Here, we performed a cell-based screen of a library of known autophagy-lysosome modulators and identified multiple novel activators of a human GRN promoter reporter including several common mTOR inhibitors and an mTOR-independent activator of autophagy, trehalose. Secondary cellular screens identified trehalose, a natural disaccharide, as the most promising lead compound because it increased endogenous PGRN in all cell lines tested and has multiple reported neuroprotective properties. Trehalose dose-dependently increased GRN mRNA as well as intracellular and secreted PGRN in both mouse and human cell lines and this effect was independent of the transcription factor EB (TFEB). Moreover, trehalose rescued PGRN deficiency in human fibroblasts and neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) generated from GRN mutation carriers. Finally, oral administration of trehalose to Grn haploinsufficient mice significantly increased PGRN expression in the brain. Conclusions: This work reports several novel autophagy-lysosome modulators that enhance PGRN expression and identifies trehalose as a promising therapeutic for raising PGRN levels to treat multiple neurodegenerative diseases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number46
JournalMolecular neurodegeneration
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 24 2016

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Autophagy
  • Frontotemporal dementia
  • Frontotemporal lobar degeneration
  • Lysosome
  • Lysosome storage disease
  • Neurodegeneration
  • Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Progranulin
  • TDP-43
  • TFEB
  • Trehalose
  • Ubiquitin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

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    Holler, C. J., Taylor, G., McEachin, Z. T., Deng, Q., Watkins, W. J., Hudson, K., Easley, C. A., Hu, W. T., Hales, C. M., Rossoll, W., Bassell, G. J., & Kukar, T. (2016). Trehalose upregulates progranulin expression in human and mouse models of GRN haploinsufficiency: A novel therapeutic lead to treat frontotemporal dementia. Molecular neurodegeneration, 11(1), [46]. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13024-016-0114-3