Trackability of distal access catheters: An in vitro quantitative evaluation of navigation strategies

Jiahui Li, Alejandro Tomasello, Manuel Requena, Pere Canals, Riccardo Tiberi, Iñaki Galve, Elisabeth Engel, David F. Kallmes, Oscar Castaño, Marc Ribo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Background: In mechanical thrombectomy (MT), distal access catheters (DACs) are tracked through the vascular anatomy to reach the occlusion site. The inability of DACs to reach the occlusion site has been reported as a predictor of unsuccessful recanalization. This study aims to provide insight into how to navigate devices through the vascular anatomy with minimal track forces, since higher forces may imply more risk of vascular injuries. Methods: We designed an experimental setup to monitor DAC track forces when navigating through an in vitro anatomical model. Experiments were recorded to study mechanical behaviors such as tension buildup against vessel walls, DAC buckling, and abrupt advancements. A multiple regression analysis was performed to predict track forces from the catheters' design specifications. Results: DACs were successfully delivered to the target M1 in 60 of 63 in vitro experiments (95.2%). Compared to navigation with unsupported DAC, the concomitant coaxial use of a microcatheter/microguidewire and microcatheter/stent retriever anchoring significantly reduced the track forces by about 63% and 77%, respectively (p<0.01). The presence of the braid pattern in the reinforcement significantly reduced the track forces regardless of the technique used (p<0.05). Combined coil and braid reinforcement configuration, as compared with coil alone, and a thinner distal wall were predictors of lower track force when navigating with unsupported DAC. Conclusions: The use of microcatheter and stent retriever facilitate smooth navigation of DACs through the vascular tortuosity to reach the occlusion site, which in turn improves the reliability of tracking when positioning the DAC closer to the thrombus interface.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numberneurintsurg-2022-018889
JournalJournal of neurointerventional surgery
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • Catheter
  • Navigation
  • Stroke
  • Thrombectomy
  • Vessel Wall

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Clinical Neurology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Trackability of distal access catheters: An in vitro quantitative evaluation of navigation strategies'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this