Thymidine analogs are transferred from prelabeled donor to host cells in the central nervous system after transplantation: A word of caution

Terry C. Burns, Xilma R. Ortiz-González, María Gutiérrez-Pérez, C. Dirk Keene, Rohit Sharda, Zachary L. Demorest, Yuehua Jiang, Molly Nelson-Holte, Mario Soriano, Yasushi Nakagawa, María Rosario Luquin, Jose Manuel Garcia-Verdugo, Felipe Prósper, Walter C. Low, Catherine M. Verfaillie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

110 Scopus citations

Abstract

Thymidine analogs, including bromodeoxyuridine, chlorodeoxyuridine, iododeoxyuridine, and tritiated thymidine, label dividing cells by incorporating into DNA during S phase of cell division and are widely employed to identify cells transplanted into the central nervous system. However, the potential for transfer of thymidine analogs from grafted cells to dividing host cells has not been thoroughly tested. We here demonstrate that graft-derived thymidine analogs can become incorporated into host neural precursors and glia. Large numbers of labeled neurons and glia were found 3-12 weeks after transplantation of thymidine analog-labeled live stem cells, suggesting differentiation of grafted cells. Remarkably, however, similar results were obtained after transplantation of dead cells or labeled fibroblasts. Our findings reveal for the first time that thymidine analog labeling may not be a reliable means of identifying transplanted cells, particularly in highly proliferative environments such as the developing, neurogenic, or injured brain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1121-1127
Number of pages7
JournalStem Cells
Volume24
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2006

Keywords

  • Adult bone marrow stem cells
  • Bromodeoxyuridine
  • Control
  • In vivo tracking
  • Label
  • Neural differentiation
  • Thymidine analog
  • Transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Medicine
  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

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