The weight of obesity on the human immune response to vaccination

Scott D. Painter, Inna G. Ovsyannikova, Gregory A. Poland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the high success of protection against several infectious diseases through effective vaccines, some sub-populations have been observed to respond poorly to vaccines, putting them at increased risk for vaccine-preventable diseases. In particular, the limited data concerning the effect of obesity on vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy suggests that obesity is a factor that increases the likelihood of a poor vaccine-induced immune response. Obesity occurs through the deposition of excess lipids into adipose tissue through the production of adipocytes, and is defined as a body-mass index (BMI)≥30kg/m<sup>2</sup>. The immune system is adversely affected by obesity, and these "immune consequences" raise concern for the lack of vaccine-induced immunity in the obese patient requiring discussion of how this sub-population might be better protected.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4422-4429
Number of pages8
JournalVaccine
Volume33
Issue number36
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 26 2015

Fingerprint

Vaccination
obesity
Vaccines
Obesity
vaccination
immune response
vaccines
Weights and Measures
Adipocytes
Population
Communicable Diseases
Adipose Tissue
Immune System
Immunity
adipocytes
Body Mass Index
infectious diseases
adipose tissue
body mass index
immune system

Keywords

  • Communicable diseases
  • Immunity
  • Immunization
  • Obesity
  • Vaccination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • veterinary(all)
  • Molecular Medicine

Cite this

Painter, S. D., Ovsyannikova, I. G., & Poland, G. A. (2015). The weight of obesity on the human immune response to vaccination. Vaccine, 33(36), 4422-4429. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.06.101

The weight of obesity on the human immune response to vaccination. / Painter, Scott D.; Ovsyannikova, Inna G.; Poland, Gregory A.

In: Vaccine, Vol. 33, No. 36, 26.08.2015, p. 4422-4429.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Painter, SD, Ovsyannikova, IG & Poland, GA 2015, 'The weight of obesity on the human immune response to vaccination', Vaccine, vol. 33, no. 36, pp. 4422-4429. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2015.06.101
Painter, Scott D. ; Ovsyannikova, Inna G. ; Poland, Gregory A. / The weight of obesity on the human immune response to vaccination. In: Vaccine. 2015 ; Vol. 33, No. 36. pp. 4422-4429.
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