The Impact of Frailty on Patient-Centered Outcomes Following Aortic Valve Replacement

Brian R. Kotajarvi, Marissa J. Schafer, Elizabeth J. Atkinson, Megan M. Traynor, Charles J Bruce, Kevin L. Greason, Rakesh M. Suri, Jordan D Miller, Nathan K LeBrasseur

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Frailty confers risk for surgical morbidity and mortality. Whether patient-reported measures of health, well-being, or quality of life respond differently to surgery in non-frail and frail individuals is unknown. Methods: Older adults with severe aortic stenosis presenting for surgery were assessed for frailty using Cardiovascular Health Study Criteria. Patient-reported measures of functional capacity (Duke Activity Status Index [DASI]), physical and mental health (Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-Physical and Mental Component Scales [SF-12 PCS and SF-12 MCS, respectively]), well-being (linear analogue self-assessment [LASA]), and quality of life (LASA) were administered before and 3 months after surgery. Results: Of 103 participants (mean age of 80.6 years), 54 were frail. Frail participants had lower baseline DASI, SF-12 PCS, SF-12 MCS, physical well-being, and quality of life scores than non-frail participants. At follow-up, frail participants showed significant improvement in physical function, with DASI and SF-12 PCS scores improving by 50% and 14%, respectively. Non-frail subjects did not significantly improve in these measures. SF-12 MCS scores also improved to a greater extent in frail compared to non-frail participants (3.6 vs < 1 point). Furthermore, the frail participants improved to a greater extent than non-frail participants in physical well-being (21.6 vs 7.1 points) and quality of life measures (25.1 vs 8.7 points). Conclusions: Frailty is prevalent in older adults with severe aortic stenosis and is associated with poor physical and mental function, physical well-being, and quality of life. In response to surgery, frail participants exhibited greater improvement in these patient-centered outcomes than non-frail peers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)917-921
Number of pages5
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
Volume72
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2017

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Aortic Valve
Quality of Life
Aortic Valve Stenosis
Health
Mental Health
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Morbidity
Mortality
Self-Assessment

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Healthspan
  • Patient-reported outcomes
  • Physical function
  • Resilience

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aging
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

The Impact of Frailty on Patient-Centered Outcomes Following Aortic Valve Replacement. / Kotajarvi, Brian R.; Schafer, Marissa J.; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Traynor, Megan M.; Bruce, Charles J; Greason, Kevin L.; Suri, Rakesh M.; Miller, Jordan D; LeBrasseur, Nathan K.

In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences, Vol. 72, No. 7, 01.07.2017, p. 917-921.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kotajarvi, Brian R. ; Schafer, Marissa J. ; Atkinson, Elizabeth J. ; Traynor, Megan M. ; Bruce, Charles J ; Greason, Kevin L. ; Suri, Rakesh M. ; Miller, Jordan D ; LeBrasseur, Nathan K. / The Impact of Frailty on Patient-Centered Outcomes Following Aortic Valve Replacement. In: Journals of Gerontology - Series A Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences. 2017 ; Vol. 72, No. 7. pp. 917-921.
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abstract = "Background: Frailty confers risk for surgical morbidity and mortality. Whether patient-reported measures of health, well-being, or quality of life respond differently to surgery in non-frail and frail individuals is unknown. Methods: Older adults with severe aortic stenosis presenting for surgery were assessed for frailty using Cardiovascular Health Study Criteria. Patient-reported measures of functional capacity (Duke Activity Status Index [DASI]), physical and mental health (Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-Physical and Mental Component Scales [SF-12 PCS and SF-12 MCS, respectively]), well-being (linear analogue self-assessment [LASA]), and quality of life (LASA) were administered before and 3 months after surgery. Results: Of 103 participants (mean age of 80.6 years), 54 were frail. Frail participants had lower baseline DASI, SF-12 PCS, SF-12 MCS, physical well-being, and quality of life scores than non-frail participants. At follow-up, frail participants showed significant improvement in physical function, with DASI and SF-12 PCS scores improving by 50{\%} and 14{\%}, respectively. Non-frail subjects did not significantly improve in these measures. SF-12 MCS scores also improved to a greater extent in frail compared to non-frail participants (3.6 vs < 1 point). Furthermore, the frail participants improved to a greater extent than non-frail participants in physical well-being (21.6 vs 7.1 points) and quality of life measures (25.1 vs 8.7 points). Conclusions: Frailty is prevalent in older adults with severe aortic stenosis and is associated with poor physical and mental function, physical well-being, and quality of life. In response to surgery, frail participants exhibited greater improvement in these patient-centered outcomes than non-frail peers.",
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AU - Kotajarvi, Brian R.

AU - Schafer, Marissa J.

AU - Atkinson, Elizabeth J.

AU - Traynor, Megan M.

AU - Bruce, Charles J

AU - Greason, Kevin L.

AU - Suri, Rakesh M.

AU - Miller, Jordan D

AU - LeBrasseur, Nathan K

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N2 - Background: Frailty confers risk for surgical morbidity and mortality. Whether patient-reported measures of health, well-being, or quality of life respond differently to surgery in non-frail and frail individuals is unknown. Methods: Older adults with severe aortic stenosis presenting for surgery were assessed for frailty using Cardiovascular Health Study Criteria. Patient-reported measures of functional capacity (Duke Activity Status Index [DASI]), physical and mental health (Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-Physical and Mental Component Scales [SF-12 PCS and SF-12 MCS, respectively]), well-being (linear analogue self-assessment [LASA]), and quality of life (LASA) were administered before and 3 months after surgery. Results: Of 103 participants (mean age of 80.6 years), 54 were frail. Frail participants had lower baseline DASI, SF-12 PCS, SF-12 MCS, physical well-being, and quality of life scores than non-frail participants. At follow-up, frail participants showed significant improvement in physical function, with DASI and SF-12 PCS scores improving by 50% and 14%, respectively. Non-frail subjects did not significantly improve in these measures. SF-12 MCS scores also improved to a greater extent in frail compared to non-frail participants (3.6 vs < 1 point). Furthermore, the frail participants improved to a greater extent than non-frail participants in physical well-being (21.6 vs 7.1 points) and quality of life measures (25.1 vs 8.7 points). Conclusions: Frailty is prevalent in older adults with severe aortic stenosis and is associated with poor physical and mental function, physical well-being, and quality of life. In response to surgery, frail participants exhibited greater improvement in these patient-centered outcomes than non-frail peers.

AB - Background: Frailty confers risk for surgical morbidity and mortality. Whether patient-reported measures of health, well-being, or quality of life respond differently to surgery in non-frail and frail individuals is unknown. Methods: Older adults with severe aortic stenosis presenting for surgery were assessed for frailty using Cardiovascular Health Study Criteria. Patient-reported measures of functional capacity (Duke Activity Status Index [DASI]), physical and mental health (Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-Physical and Mental Component Scales [SF-12 PCS and SF-12 MCS, respectively]), well-being (linear analogue self-assessment [LASA]), and quality of life (LASA) were administered before and 3 months after surgery. Results: Of 103 participants (mean age of 80.6 years), 54 were frail. Frail participants had lower baseline DASI, SF-12 PCS, SF-12 MCS, physical well-being, and quality of life scores than non-frail participants. At follow-up, frail participants showed significant improvement in physical function, with DASI and SF-12 PCS scores improving by 50% and 14%, respectively. Non-frail subjects did not significantly improve in these measures. SF-12 MCS scores also improved to a greater extent in frail compared to non-frail participants (3.6 vs < 1 point). Furthermore, the frail participants improved to a greater extent than non-frail participants in physical well-being (21.6 vs 7.1 points) and quality of life measures (25.1 vs 8.7 points). Conclusions: Frailty is prevalent in older adults with severe aortic stenosis and is associated with poor physical and mental function, physical well-being, and quality of life. In response to surgery, frail participants exhibited greater improvement in these patient-centered outcomes than non-frail peers.

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KW - Resilience

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