The global burden of myocarditis: Part 1: A systematic literature review for the global burden of diseases, injuries, and risk factors 2010 study

Leslie T. Cooper, Andre Keren, Karen Sliwa, Akira Matsumori, George A. Mensah

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

46 Scopus citations

Abstract

Myocarditis contributes to the global burden of cardiovascular disease primarily through sudden death and dilated cardiomyopathy. A systematic approach to identify the cardiovascular mortality and major morbidity attributable to myocarditis has not been performed. A writing group convened by the GBD 2010 (Global Burden of Diseases, Injuries and Risk Factors) Study systematically reviewed the world's literature by a manual review of all titles since 1966 on myocarditis identified using Ovid Medline, development of a disease model, and provision of estimates when possible of the incidence, prevalence, risk of death, and major morbidity for the world regions. Accurate population-based estimates of myocarditis incidence and prevalence are not directly available in any world region. However, a model that quantitates the risk of acute death and chronic heart failure following myocarditis was derived from the published data. Using hospital dismissal data, the burden of myocarditis as a percentage of prevalent heart failure varied by age and region from approximately 0.5% to 4.0%. The novel combination of multiple data sources may provide an estimate of the years of life lost and years of life disabled from myocarditis. Pending the integration of these data sources, the burden of dilated cardiomyopathy and myocarditis were reported together in the 2010 GBD report. The 2013 GBD project may refine these estimates with the inclusion of more comprehensive payor databases and more precise case definitions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-129
Number of pages9
JournalGlobal Heart
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Community and Home Care
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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