The energy expenditure of an activity-promoting video game compared to sedentary video games and TV watching

Naim Mitre, Randal C. Foster, Lorraine Lanningham-Foster, James A. Levine

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: In the present study we investigated the effect of television watching and the use of activity-promoting video games on energy expenditure in obese and lean children. Methods: Energy expenditure and physical activity were measured while participants were watching television, playing a video game on a traditional sedentary video game console, and while playing the same video game on an activity-promoting video game console. Results: Energy expenditure was significantly greater than television watching and playing video games on a sedentary video game console when children played the video game on the activity-promoting console. When examining movement with accelerometry, children moved significantly more when playing the video game on the Nintendo Wii console. Conclusion: Activity-promoting video games have shown to increase movement, and be an important tool to raise energy expenditure by 50 % when compared to sedentary activities of daily living.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)689-695
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume24
Issue number9-10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2011

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Video Games
Energy Metabolism
Television
Accelerometry
Activities of Daily Living
Exercise

Keywords

  • Children
  • Energy expenditure
  • Obesity
  • Physical activity
  • Television
  • Video-games

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

The energy expenditure of an activity-promoting video game compared to sedentary video games and TV watching. / Mitre, Naim; Foster, Randal C.; Lanningham-Foster, Lorraine; Levine, James A.

In: Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 24, No. 9-10, 10.2011, p. 689-695.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mitre, Naim ; Foster, Randal C. ; Lanningham-Foster, Lorraine ; Levine, James A. / The energy expenditure of an activity-promoting video game compared to sedentary video games and TV watching. In: Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism. 2011 ; Vol. 24, No. 9-10. pp. 689-695.
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