The Effect of Advanced Practice Providers on ACGME Colon and Rectal Surgery Resident Diagnostic Index Case Volumes

Scott R. Kelley, Jonathan D. D'Angelo, Anne Lise D. D'Angelo, Kevin T. Behm, Dorin T. Colibaseanu, Amit Merchea, Nitin Mishra, Eric J. Dozois, Kellie L. Mathis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: Prior to 2015 residents in our Accreditation Council for Graduation Medical Education (ACGME) colon and rectal surgery training program were in charge of managing, with faculty oversight, the outpatient anorectal clinic at our institution. Starting in 2015 advanced practice providers (APPs) working in the division assumed management of the clinic. The effect of APPs on ACGME resident index diagnostic case volumes has not been explored. Herein we examine ACGME case log graduate statistics to determine if the inclusion of APPs into our anorectal clinic practice has negatively affected resident index diagnostic anorectal case volumes. Design: ACGME year-end program reports were obtained for the years 2011 to 2019. Program anorectal diagnostic index volumes were recorded and compared to division volumes. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) tests were conducted to assess whether the number of cases per year (for each respective case type) prior to the introduction of APPs into the anorectal clinic (2011-2014) differed from the number of cases per year with the APP clinic in place (2015-2018). A p-value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Setting: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (quaternary referral center). Participants: Colon and rectal surgery resident year-end ACGME reports (2011-2019). Results: ANOVAs revealed a marginally significant (p = 0.007) downtrend for hemorrhoid diagnostic codes, and a significant uptrend (p = 0.000) for fistula cases. Controlling for overall division volume, ANCOVA only reveled significance for fistula cases (p = 0.004) with the involvement of APPs. Conclusions: At our institution we found the inclusion of APPs into our anorectal clinic practice did not negatively affect colon and rectal surgery resident ACGME index diagnostic anorectal case volumes. Inclusion of APPs into a multidisciplinary practice can promote resident education by allowing trainees to pursue other educational opportunities without hindering ACGME index case volumes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Surgical Education
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • ACGME
  • advanced practice practitioner
  • colon and rectal surgery
  • index case
  • nurse practitioner
  • physician assistant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Education

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