The definition of alcoholism

Robert M. Morse, Daniel K. Flavin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

169 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To establish a more precise use of the term alcoholism, a 23-member multidisciplinary committee of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the American Society of Addiction Medicine conducted a 2-year study of the definition of alcoholism in the light of current concepts. The goals of the committee were to create by consensus a revised definition that is (1) scientifically valid, (2) clinically useful, and (3) understandable by the general public. Therefore, the committee agreed to define alcoholism as a primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. It is characterized by impaired control over drinking, preoccupation with the drug alcohol, use of alcohol despite adverse consequences, and distortions in thinking, most notably denial. Each of these symptoms may be continuous or periodic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1012-1014
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume268
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 26 1992
Externally publishedYes

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Alcoholism
Alcohols
Committee Membership
Drinking
Substance-Related Disorders
Consensus
Chronic Disease
Medicine
Psychology
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Morse, R. M., & Flavin, D. K. (1992). The definition of alcoholism. Journal of the American Medical Association, 268(8), 1012-1014.

The definition of alcoholism. / Morse, Robert M.; Flavin, Daniel K.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 268, No. 8, 26.08.1992, p. 1012-1014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Morse, RM & Flavin, DK 1992, 'The definition of alcoholism', Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 268, no. 8, pp. 1012-1014.
Morse RM, Flavin DK. The definition of alcoholism. Journal of the American Medical Association. 1992 Aug 26;268(8):1012-1014.
Morse, Robert M. ; Flavin, Daniel K. / The definition of alcoholism. In: Journal of the American Medical Association. 1992 ; Vol. 268, No. 8. pp. 1012-1014.
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