Teaching evidence-based medicine to internal medicine residents

The efficacy of conferences versus small-group discussion

Kris G. Thomas, Matthew R. Thomas, Elaine B. York, Denise M. Dupras, Henry J. Schultz, Joseph C. Kolars

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Evidence-based medicine (EBM) is a required component of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education's Practice-Based Learning core competency. Purpose: To compare the efficacy of conferences and small-group discussions in enhancing EBM competency. Methods: EBM conferences and small-group discussions were integrated into an internal medicine curriculum. EBM competency was assessed by written examination following participation in both groups and compared with residents who had not participated in either format. Results: Small-group discussion participants (n = 10) scored higher on an EBM exam (17.8 ± 4.5 correct out of 25) when compared with 10 conference participants (12.2 ± 4.6, p = .010) and 26 residents who did not participate in either format (12.0 ± 4.5, p = .002). Small-group discussion participants also reported increased confidence and high satisfaction. Conclusions: Although more resource intensive, small-group discussions resulted in increased EBM knowledge, increased confidence with critical appraisal skills, and high satisfaction compared with a conference-based format.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)130-135
Number of pages6
JournalTeaching and Learning in Medicine
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005

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Evidence-Based Medicine
Internal Medicine
group discussion
small group
Teaching
medicine
resident
evidence
Graduate Medical Education
confidence
Accreditation
Curriculum
accreditation
Learning
graduate
curriculum
examination
participation
resources
learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Teaching evidence-based medicine to internal medicine residents : The efficacy of conferences versus small-group discussion. / Thomas, Kris G.; Thomas, Matthew R.; York, Elaine B.; Dupras, Denise M.; Schultz, Henry J.; Kolars, Joseph C.

In: Teaching and Learning in Medicine, Vol. 17, No. 2, 03.2005, p. 130-135.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thomas, Kris G. ; Thomas, Matthew R. ; York, Elaine B. ; Dupras, Denise M. ; Schultz, Henry J. ; Kolars, Joseph C. / Teaching evidence-based medicine to internal medicine residents : The efficacy of conferences versus small-group discussion. In: Teaching and Learning in Medicine. 2005 ; Vol. 17, No. 2. pp. 130-135.
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