Taming chronic cough

Matthew A Rank, Pramod Kelkar, John J. Oppenheimer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To review the available evidence on treating chronic cough to relay a thoughtful, evidence-based approach for the diagnosis and treatment of chronic cough. Data Sources: MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, and CINAHL were searched using the following keywords: cough, asthma, gastroesophageal reflux, sinusitis, rhinitis (allergic, seasonal), postnasal drip, vocal cord dysfunction, lung disease (interstitial), bronchiectasis, and bronchoscopy. Study Selection: Studies were selected based on their relevance to the diagnosis and treatment of chronic cough. Because of a lack of randomized prospective studies, nonrandomized and retrospective studies were considered, with their strengths and limitations noted. Results: Few randomized controlled trials have addressed the diagnosis and treatment of chronic cough. There are several prospective noncontrolled trials for adults with chronic cough that found a high percentage of cough resolution when using an approach that focused on the diagnosis and treatment of the most common causes: asthma, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and upper airway cough syndrome. Preliminary studies in children support an approach that distinguishes between a wet and dry cough, as well as an in-depth investigation of any specific symptoms that point to an underlying chronic illness. Conclusion: Allergists, as experts in treating upper airway and lower airway disorders, are uniquely poised to diagnose and treat chronic cough.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)305-313
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Volume98
Issue number4
StatePublished - Apr 2007

Fingerprint

Cough
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Vocal Cord Dysfunction
Asthma
Bronchiectasis
Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis
Information Storage and Retrieval
Sinusitis
Interstitial Lung Diseases
Bronchoscopy
Therapeutics
PubMed
MEDLINE
Chronic Disease
Randomized Controlled Trials
Retrospective Studies
Prospective Studies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Rank, M. A., Kelkar, P., & Oppenheimer, J. J. (2007). Taming chronic cough. Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, 98(4), 305-313.

Taming chronic cough. / Rank, Matthew A; Kelkar, Pramod; Oppenheimer, John J.

In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, Vol. 98, No. 4, 04.2007, p. 305-313.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rank, MA, Kelkar, P & Oppenheimer, JJ 2007, 'Taming chronic cough', Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, vol. 98, no. 4, pp. 305-313.
Rank MA, Kelkar P, Oppenheimer JJ. Taming chronic cough. Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. 2007 Apr;98(4):305-313.
Rank, Matthew A ; Kelkar, Pramod ; Oppenheimer, John J. / Taming chronic cough. In: Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. 2007 ; Vol. 98, No. 4. pp. 305-313.
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