Surrogate endpoint validation: Statistical elegance versus clinical relevance

E. M. Green, G. Yothers, Daniel J. Sargent

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A variety of approaches have been proposed to provide formal and informal validation of proposed surrogate markers. To achieve true clinical impact, the validation must convince both the statistical and clinical communities. In this paper, we argue that the best approach is not a single method but a multi-faceted exploration, using multiple approaches, including those that directly appeal to clinicians but with less statistical foundation and those arising from statistical considerations but more difficult to interpret clinically. We illustrate our approach using data from clinical trials in both early and advanced colorectal cancer.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)477-486
Number of pages10
JournalStatistical Methods in Medical Research
Volume17
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2008

Fingerprint

Surrogate Endpoint
Colorectal Neoplasms
Biomarkers
Clinical Trials
Surrogate Markers
Colorectal Cancer
Appeal
Relevance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Information Management
  • Statistics and Probability

Cite this

Surrogate endpoint validation : Statistical elegance versus clinical relevance. / Green, E. M.; Yothers, G.; Sargent, Daniel J.

In: Statistical Methods in Medical Research, Vol. 17, No. 5, 2008, p. 477-486.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Green, E. M. ; Yothers, G. ; Sargent, Daniel J. / Surrogate endpoint validation : Statistical elegance versus clinical relevance. In: Statistical Methods in Medical Research. 2008 ; Vol. 17, No. 5. pp. 477-486.
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