Surgical Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

Daniel Zamora-Valdes, Timucin Taner, David M. Nagorney

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major cause of cancer-related death worldwide. In select patients, surgical treatment in the form of either resection or transplantation offers a curative option. The aims of this review are to (1) review the current American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases/European Association for the Study of the Liver guidelines on the surgical management of HCC and (2) review the proposed changes to these guidelines and analyze the strength of evidence underlying these proposals. Three authors identified the most relevant publications in the literature on liver resection and transplantation for HCC and analyzed the strength of evidence according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) classification. In the United States, the liver allocation system provides priority for liver transplantation to patients with HCC within the Milan criteria. Current evidence suggests that liver transplantation may also be indicated in certain patient groups beyond Milan criteria, such as pediatric patients with large tumor burden or adult patients who are successfully downstaged. Patients with no underlying liver disease may also benefit from liver transplantation if the HCC is unresectable. In patients with no or minimal (compensated) liver disease and solitary HCC ≥2 cm, liver resection is warranted. If liver transplantation is not available or contraindicated, liver resection can be offered to patients with multinodular HCC, provided that the underlying liver disease is not decompensated. Many patients may benefit from surgical strategies adapted to local resources and policies (hepatitis B prevalence, organ availability, etc). Although current low-quality evidence shows better overall survival with aggressive surgical strategies, this approach is limited to select patients. Larger and well-designed prospective studies are needed to better define the benefits and limits of such approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCancer Control
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 6 2017

Fingerprint

Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Liver Transplantation
Therapeutics
Liver Diseases
Liver
Guidelines
Tumor Burden
Hepatitis B
Publications
Transplantation
Prospective Studies
Pediatrics
Survival

Keywords

  • hepatectomy
  • hepatocellular carcinoma
  • liver cancer
  • liver transplantation
  • resection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Surgical Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma. / Zamora-Valdes, Daniel; Taner, Timucin; Nagorney, David M.

In: Cancer Control, Vol. 24, No. 3, 06.09.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Zamora-Valdes, Daniel ; Taner, Timucin ; Nagorney, David M. / Surgical Treatment of Hepatocellular Carcinoma. In: Cancer Control. 2017 ; Vol. 24, No. 3.
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