Surface modification of nanoparticles enables selective evasion of phagocytic clearance by distinct macrophage phenotypes

Yaqing Qie, Hengfeng Yuan, Christina A. Von Roemeling, Yuanxin Chen, Xiujie Liu, Kevin D. Shih, Joshua A. Knight, Han W Tun, Robert E. Wharen, Wen Jiang, Y S Betty Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nanomedicine is a burgeoning industry but an understanding of the interaction of nanomaterials with the immune system is critical for clinical translation. Macrophages play a fundamental role in the immune system by engulfing foreign particulates such as nanoparticles. When activated, macrophages form distinct phenotypic populations with unique immune functions, however the mechanism by which these polarized macrophages react to nanoparticles is unclear. Furthermore, strategies to selectively evade activated macrophage subpopulations are lacking. Here we demonstrate that stimulated macrophages possess higher phagocytic activities and that classically activated (M1) macrophages exhibit greater phagocytic capacity than alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. We show that modification of nanoparticles with polyethylene-glycol results in decreased clearance by all macrophage phenotypes, but importantly, coating nanoparticles with CD47 preferentially lowers phagocytic activity by the M1 phenotype. These results suggest that bio-inspired nanoparticle surface design may enable evasion of specific components of the immune system and provide a rational approach for developing immune tolerant nanomedicines.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number26269
JournalScientific Reports
Volume6
DOIs
StatePublished - May 19 2016

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Nanoparticles
Macrophages
Phenotype
Nanomedicine
Immune System
Nanostructures
Industry
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

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Surface modification of nanoparticles enables selective evasion of phagocytic clearance by distinct macrophage phenotypes. / Qie, Yaqing; Yuan, Hengfeng; Von Roemeling, Christina A.; Chen, Yuanxin; Liu, Xiujie; Shih, Kevin D.; Knight, Joshua A.; Tun, Han W; Wharen, Robert E.; Jiang, Wen; Kim, Y S Betty.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 6, 26269, 19.05.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Qie, Yaqing ; Yuan, Hengfeng ; Von Roemeling, Christina A. ; Chen, Yuanxin ; Liu, Xiujie ; Shih, Kevin D. ; Knight, Joshua A. ; Tun, Han W ; Wharen, Robert E. ; Jiang, Wen ; Kim, Y S Betty. / Surface modification of nanoparticles enables selective evasion of phagocytic clearance by distinct macrophage phenotypes. In: Scientific Reports. 2016 ; Vol. 6.
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