Subsequent Total Joint Arthroplasty After Primary Total Knee or Hip Arthroplasty

A 40-Year Population-Based Study

Thomas L. Sanders, Hilal D Maradit Kremers, Cathy D. Schleck, Dirk R. Larson, Daniel J. Berry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Despite the large increase in total hip arthroplasties and total knee arthroplasties, the incidence and prevalence of additional contralateral or ipsilateral joint arthroplasty are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of additional joint arthroplasty after a primary total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty.

METHODS: This historical cohort study identified population-based cohorts of patients who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty (n = 1,933) or total knee arthroplasty (n = 2,139) between 1969 and 2008. Patients underwent passive follow-up through their medical records beginning with the primary total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty. We assessed the likelihood of undergoing a subsequent total joint arthroplasty, including simultaneous and staged bilateral procedures. Age, sex, and calendar year were evaluated as potential predictors of subsequent arthroplasty.

RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 12 years after an initial total hip arthroplasty, we observed 422 contralateral total hip arthroplasties (29% at 20 years), 76 contralateral total knee arthroplasties (6% at 10 years), and 32 ipsilateral total knee arthroplasties (2% at 20 years). Younger age was a significant predictor of contralateral total hip arthroplasty (p < 0.0001), but not a predictor of the subsequent risk of total knee arthroplasty. During a mean follow-up of 11 years after an initial total knee arthroplasty, we observed 809 contralateral total knee arthroplasties (45% at 20 years), 31 contralateral total hip arthroplasties (3% at 20 years), and 29 ipsilateral total hip arthroplasties (2% at 20 years). Older age was a significant predictor of ipsilateral or contralateral total hip arthroplasty (p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty can be informed of a 30% to 45% chance of a surgical procedure in a contralateral cognate joint and about a 5% chance of a surgical procedure in noncognate joints within 20 years of initial arthroplasty. Increased risk of contralateral total knee arthroplasty following an initial total hip arthroplasty may be due to gait changes prior to and/or following total hip arthroplasty. The higher prevalence of bilateral total hip arthroplasty in younger patients may result from bilateral disease processes that selectively affect the young hip, such as osteonecrosis, or structural hip problems, such as acetabular dysplasia or femoroacetabular impingement.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)396-401
Number of pages6
JournalThe Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume
Volume99
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

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Arthroplasty
Hip
Knee
Joints
Knee Replacement Arthroplasties
Population
Femoracetabular Impingement
Osteonecrosis
Gait

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Cite this

Subsequent Total Joint Arthroplasty After Primary Total Knee or Hip Arthroplasty : A 40-Year Population-Based Study. / Sanders, Thomas L.; Maradit Kremers, Hilal D; Schleck, Cathy D.; Larson, Dirk R.; Berry, Daniel J.

In: The Journal of bone and joint surgery. American volume, Vol. 99, No. 5, 01.03.2017, p. 396-401.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "BACKGROUND: Despite the large increase in total hip arthroplasties and total knee arthroplasties, the incidence and prevalence of additional contralateral or ipsilateral joint arthroplasty are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of additional joint arthroplasty after a primary total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty.METHODS: This historical cohort study identified population-based cohorts of patients who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty (n = 1,933) or total knee arthroplasty (n = 2,139) between 1969 and 2008. Patients underwent passive follow-up through their medical records beginning with the primary total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty. We assessed the likelihood of undergoing a subsequent total joint arthroplasty, including simultaneous and staged bilateral procedures. Age, sex, and calendar year were evaluated as potential predictors of subsequent arthroplasty.RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 12 years after an initial total hip arthroplasty, we observed 422 contralateral total hip arthroplasties (29{\%} at 20 years), 76 contralateral total knee arthroplasties (6{\%} at 10 years), and 32 ipsilateral total knee arthroplasties (2{\%} at 20 years). Younger age was a significant predictor of contralateral total hip arthroplasty (p < 0.0001), but not a predictor of the subsequent risk of total knee arthroplasty. During a mean follow-up of 11 years after an initial total knee arthroplasty, we observed 809 contralateral total knee arthroplasties (45{\%} at 20 years), 31 contralateral total hip arthroplasties (3{\%} at 20 years), and 29 ipsilateral total hip arthroplasties (2{\%} at 20 years). Older age was a significant predictor of ipsilateral or contralateral total hip arthroplasty (p < 0.001).CONCLUSIONS: Patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty can be informed of a 30{\%} to 45{\%} chance of a surgical procedure in a contralateral cognate joint and about a 5{\%} chance of a surgical procedure in noncognate joints within 20 years of initial arthroplasty. Increased risk of contralateral total knee arthroplasty following an initial total hip arthroplasty may be due to gait changes prior to and/or following total hip arthroplasty. The higher prevalence of bilateral total hip arthroplasty in younger patients may result from bilateral disease processes that selectively affect the young hip, such as osteonecrosis, or structural hip problems, such as acetabular dysplasia or femoroacetabular impingement.LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.",
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T2 - A 40-Year Population-Based Study

AU - Sanders, Thomas L.

AU - Maradit Kremers, Hilal D

AU - Schleck, Cathy D.

AU - Larson, Dirk R.

AU - Berry, Daniel J.

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N2 - BACKGROUND: Despite the large increase in total hip arthroplasties and total knee arthroplasties, the incidence and prevalence of additional contralateral or ipsilateral joint arthroplasty are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of additional joint arthroplasty after a primary total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty.METHODS: This historical cohort study identified population-based cohorts of patients who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty (n = 1,933) or total knee arthroplasty (n = 2,139) between 1969 and 2008. Patients underwent passive follow-up through their medical records beginning with the primary total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty. We assessed the likelihood of undergoing a subsequent total joint arthroplasty, including simultaneous and staged bilateral procedures. Age, sex, and calendar year were evaluated as potential predictors of subsequent arthroplasty.RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 12 years after an initial total hip arthroplasty, we observed 422 contralateral total hip arthroplasties (29% at 20 years), 76 contralateral total knee arthroplasties (6% at 10 years), and 32 ipsilateral total knee arthroplasties (2% at 20 years). Younger age was a significant predictor of contralateral total hip arthroplasty (p < 0.0001), but not a predictor of the subsequent risk of total knee arthroplasty. During a mean follow-up of 11 years after an initial total knee arthroplasty, we observed 809 contralateral total knee arthroplasties (45% at 20 years), 31 contralateral total hip arthroplasties (3% at 20 years), and 29 ipsilateral total hip arthroplasties (2% at 20 years). Older age was a significant predictor of ipsilateral or contralateral total hip arthroplasty (p < 0.001).CONCLUSIONS: Patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty can be informed of a 30% to 45% chance of a surgical procedure in a contralateral cognate joint and about a 5% chance of a surgical procedure in noncognate joints within 20 years of initial arthroplasty. Increased risk of contralateral total knee arthroplasty following an initial total hip arthroplasty may be due to gait changes prior to and/or following total hip arthroplasty. The higher prevalence of bilateral total hip arthroplasty in younger patients may result from bilateral disease processes that selectively affect the young hip, such as osteonecrosis, or structural hip problems, such as acetabular dysplasia or femoroacetabular impingement.LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

AB - BACKGROUND: Despite the large increase in total hip arthroplasties and total knee arthroplasties, the incidence and prevalence of additional contralateral or ipsilateral joint arthroplasty are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the rate of additional joint arthroplasty after a primary total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty.METHODS: This historical cohort study identified population-based cohorts of patients who underwent primary total hip arthroplasty (n = 1,933) or total knee arthroplasty (n = 2,139) between 1969 and 2008. Patients underwent passive follow-up through their medical records beginning with the primary total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty. We assessed the likelihood of undergoing a subsequent total joint arthroplasty, including simultaneous and staged bilateral procedures. Age, sex, and calendar year were evaluated as potential predictors of subsequent arthroplasty.RESULTS: During a mean follow-up of 12 years after an initial total hip arthroplasty, we observed 422 contralateral total hip arthroplasties (29% at 20 years), 76 contralateral total knee arthroplasties (6% at 10 years), and 32 ipsilateral total knee arthroplasties (2% at 20 years). Younger age was a significant predictor of contralateral total hip arthroplasty (p < 0.0001), but not a predictor of the subsequent risk of total knee arthroplasty. During a mean follow-up of 11 years after an initial total knee arthroplasty, we observed 809 contralateral total knee arthroplasties (45% at 20 years), 31 contralateral total hip arthroplasties (3% at 20 years), and 29 ipsilateral total hip arthroplasties (2% at 20 years). Older age was a significant predictor of ipsilateral or contralateral total hip arthroplasty (p < 0.001).CONCLUSIONS: Patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty or total knee arthroplasty can be informed of a 30% to 45% chance of a surgical procedure in a contralateral cognate joint and about a 5% chance of a surgical procedure in noncognate joints within 20 years of initial arthroplasty. Increased risk of contralateral total knee arthroplasty following an initial total hip arthroplasty may be due to gait changes prior to and/or following total hip arthroplasty. The higher prevalence of bilateral total hip arthroplasty in younger patients may result from bilateral disease processes that selectively affect the young hip, such as osteonecrosis, or structural hip problems, such as acetabular dysplasia or femoroacetabular impingement.LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Therapeutic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.

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