Striatal adenosine signaling regulates EAAT2 and astrocytic AQP4 expression and alcohol drinking in mice

Moonnoh R. Lee, Christina L. Ruby, David J. Hinton, Sun Choi, Chelsea A. Adams, Na Young Kang, Doo Sup Choi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Adenosine signaling is implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including alcoholism. Among its diverse functions in the brain, adenosine regulates glutamate release and has an essential role in ethanol sensitivity and preference. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying adenosine-mediated glutamate signaling in neuroglial interaction remain elusive. We have previously shown that mice lacking the ethanol-sensitive adenosine transporter, type 1 equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT1), drink more ethanol compared with wild-type mice and have elevated striatal glutamate levels. In addition, ENT1 inhibition or knockdown reduces glutamate transporter expression in cultured astrocytes. Here, we examined how adenosine signaling in astrocytes contributes to ethanol drinking. Inhibition or deletion of ENT1 reduced the expression of type 2 excitatory amino-acid transporter (EAAT2) and the astrocyte-specific water channel, aquaporin 4 (AQP4). EAAT2 and AQP4 colocalization was also reduced in the striatum of ENT1 null mice. Ceftriaxone, an antibiotic compound known to increase EAAT2 expression and function, elevated not only EAAT2 but also AQP4 expression in the striatum. Furthermore, ceftriaxone reduced ethanol drinking, suggesting that ENT1-mediated downregulation of EAAT2 and AQP4 expression contributes to excessive ethanol consumption in our mouse model. Overall, our findings indicate that adenosine signaling regulates EAAT2 and astrocytic AQP4 expressions, which control ethanol drinking in mice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)437-445
Number of pages9
JournalNeuropsychopharmacology
Volume38
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013

Fingerprint

Aquaporin 4
Corpus Striatum
Alcohol Drinking
Adenosine
Ethanol
Astrocytes
Drinking
Glutamic Acid
Ceftriaxone
Excitatory Amino Acid Transporter 2
Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter 1
Amino Acid Transport System X-AG
Aquaporins
Alcoholism
Down-Regulation
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Brain

Keywords

  • Alcoholism
  • aquaporin 4
  • astrocytes
  • ceftriaxone
  • EAAT2
  • ENT1

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Striatal adenosine signaling regulates EAAT2 and astrocytic AQP4 expression and alcohol drinking in mice. / Lee, Moonnoh R.; Ruby, Christina L.; Hinton, David J.; Choi, Sun; Adams, Chelsea A.; Young Kang, Na; Choi, Doo Sup.

In: Neuropsychopharmacology, Vol. 38, No. 3, 02.2013, p. 437-445.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Moonnoh R. ; Ruby, Christina L. ; Hinton, David J. ; Choi, Sun ; Adams, Chelsea A. ; Young Kang, Na ; Choi, Doo Sup. / Striatal adenosine signaling regulates EAAT2 and astrocytic AQP4 expression and alcohol drinking in mice. In: Neuropsychopharmacology. 2013 ; Vol. 38, No. 3. pp. 437-445.
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