Spatial misregistration of vascular flow during MR imaging of the CNS: Cause and clinical significance

T. C. Larson, W. M. Kelly, Richard Lorne Ehman, F. W. Wehrli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Spatial misregistration of signal recovered from flowing spins within vascular structures is a common phenomenon seen in MR imaging of the CNS. The condition is displayed as a bright line or dot offset from the true anatomic location of the lumen of the imaged vessel. Its origin is the time delay between application of the phase- and frequency-encoding gradients used to locate spins within the plane of section. The principal condition necessary for the production of spatial misregistration is flow oblique to the axis of the phase-encoding gradient. Flow-related enhancement (entry slice phenomenon), even-echo rephasing, and gradient-moment nulling contribute to the production of the bright signal of spatial misregistration. Familiarity with the typical appearance of flow-dependent spatial misregistration permits confirmation of a vessel's patency; identification of the direction of flow; estimation of the velocity of flow; and differentiation of this flow artifact from atheromas, dissection, intraluminal clot, and artifacts such as chemical shift.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1117-1124
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Roentgenology
Volume155
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

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Artifacts
Blood Vessels
Atherosclerotic Plaques
Dissection
Recognition (Psychology)
Direction compound

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology

Cite this

Spatial misregistration of vascular flow during MR imaging of the CNS : Cause and clinical significance. / Larson, T. C.; Kelly, W. M.; Ehman, Richard Lorne; Wehrli, F. W.

In: American Journal of Roentgenology, Vol. 155, No. 5, 1990, p. 1117-1124.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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