Social Issues and Epilepsy

Joseph F. Drazkowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

People with epilepsy live and struggle every day with social issues that are relatively minor for people without epilepsy. Apprehension about securing and maintaining one's job or getting a driver's license is significantly greater for the person with epilepsy. Misconceptions held by the general public about epilepsy contribute to and often compound the difficulties and fears experienced by people with epilepsy. Because different people in society react to seizures in different ways, it is important to foster a supportive environment for people with epilepsy. This can be achieved by health care providers and families of people with epilepsy, who can help minimize the negative and inaccurate perceptions that are prevalent regarding people with epilepsy, and maximize their opportunities to integrate successfully into society.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)56-59
Number of pages4
JournalCNS Spectrums
Volume2
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Epilepsy
Licensure
Health Personnel
Fear
Seizures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Social Issues and Epilepsy. / Drazkowski, Joseph F.

In: CNS Spectrums, Vol. 2, No. 6, 1997, p. 56-59.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Drazkowski, Joseph F. / Social Issues and Epilepsy. In: CNS Spectrums. 1997 ; Vol. 2, No. 6. pp. 56-59.
@article{37a7130c52ca4ec3adce5a2655fc25d2,
title = "Social Issues and Epilepsy",
abstract = "People with epilepsy live and struggle every day with social issues that are relatively minor for people without epilepsy. Apprehension about securing and maintaining one's job or getting a driver's license is significantly greater for the person with epilepsy. Misconceptions held by the general public about epilepsy contribute to and often compound the difficulties and fears experienced by people with epilepsy. Because different people in society react to seizures in different ways, it is important to foster a supportive environment for people with epilepsy. This can be achieved by health care providers and families of people with epilepsy, who can help minimize the negative and inaccurate perceptions that are prevalent regarding people with epilepsy, and maximize their opportunities to integrate successfully into society.",
author = "Drazkowski, {Joseph F.}",
year = "1997",
doi = "10.1017/S1092852900010798",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2",
pages = "56--59",
journal = "CNS Spectrums",
issn = "1092-8529",
publisher = "MBL Communications",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social Issues and Epilepsy

AU - Drazkowski, Joseph F.

PY - 1997

Y1 - 1997

N2 - People with epilepsy live and struggle every day with social issues that are relatively minor for people without epilepsy. Apprehension about securing and maintaining one's job or getting a driver's license is significantly greater for the person with epilepsy. Misconceptions held by the general public about epilepsy contribute to and often compound the difficulties and fears experienced by people with epilepsy. Because different people in society react to seizures in different ways, it is important to foster a supportive environment for people with epilepsy. This can be achieved by health care providers and families of people with epilepsy, who can help minimize the negative and inaccurate perceptions that are prevalent regarding people with epilepsy, and maximize their opportunities to integrate successfully into society.

AB - People with epilepsy live and struggle every day with social issues that are relatively minor for people without epilepsy. Apprehension about securing and maintaining one's job or getting a driver's license is significantly greater for the person with epilepsy. Misconceptions held by the general public about epilepsy contribute to and often compound the difficulties and fears experienced by people with epilepsy. Because different people in society react to seizures in different ways, it is important to foster a supportive environment for people with epilepsy. This can be achieved by health care providers and families of people with epilepsy, who can help minimize the negative and inaccurate perceptions that are prevalent regarding people with epilepsy, and maximize their opportunities to integrate successfully into society.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85011523927&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85011523927&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S1092852900010798

DO - 10.1017/S1092852900010798

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85011523927

VL - 2

SP - 56

EP - 59

JO - CNS Spectrums

JF - CNS Spectrums

SN - 1092-8529

IS - 6

ER -