Serum and hepatic vitamin E assessment in cirrhotics before transplantation

Andrzej Ukleja, James S. Scolapio, Joseph P. McConnell, Rolland Dickson, Justin H Nguyen, Peter C. O'Brien

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Hepatic vitamin E may have a protective effect against hepatocyte injury; therefore, vitamin E replacement or supplementation may be beneficial in patients with cirrhosis. However, serum vitamin E may not correlate with hepatic vitamin E stores, making decisions regarding treatment difficult based on serum levels alone. The specific aims of this study were to determine hepatic concentrations of vitamin E and to determine whether serum levels of vitamin E correlate with hepatic vitamin E stores in cirrhotics. Methods: A prospective study of cirrhotics undergoing orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) was completed. Serum and hepatic levels of vitamin E were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Statistical analysis was performed using rank sum tests and Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Results: Fifty cirrhotics (33 males, 17 females; mean age of 53 years) were studied. The control group (25 males, 25 females; mean age of 47 years) consisted of the liver donors. The median serum levels of vitamin E in controls and cirrhotics were 5.95 and 7.8 mg/L, respectively (p = .009). The median hepatic levels (0.10 mg/g) in the control and cirrhotic groups were similar (p = .037). There was a significant correlation between serum and hepatic vitamin E levels in cirrhotics (R = 0.335; p = .017). Conclusions: A positive correlation exists between serum and hepatic concentrations of vitamin E in cirrhotics, therefore making serum vitamin E levels a useful reference for treatment using exogenous vitamin E.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)71-73
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
Volume27
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 2003

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Vitamin E
vitamin E
Transplantation
liver
Liver
Serum
Nonparametric Statistics
liver transplant
Control Groups
prospective studies
Liver Transplantation
hepatocytes
protective effect
decision making
Hepatocytes
Decision Making
Fibrosis
statistical analysis
high performance liquid chromatography
High Pressure Liquid Chromatography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Serum and hepatic vitamin E assessment in cirrhotics before transplantation. / Ukleja, Andrzej; Scolapio, James S.; McConnell, Joseph P.; Dickson, Rolland; Nguyen, Justin H; O'Brien, Peter C.

In: Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, Vol. 27, No. 1, 01.2003, p. 71-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ukleja, Andrzej ; Scolapio, James S. ; McConnell, Joseph P. ; Dickson, Rolland ; Nguyen, Justin H ; O'Brien, Peter C. / Serum and hepatic vitamin E assessment in cirrhotics before transplantation. In: Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition. 2003 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 71-73.
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