Selection criteria for internal medicine residency applicants and professionalism ratings during internship

Michael W. Cullen, Darcy A. Reed, Andrew J. Halvorsen, Christopher M. Wittich, Lisa M. Baumann Kreuziger, Mira Keddis, Furman S. Mcdonald, Thomas J. Beckman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether standardized admissions data in residents' Electronic Residency Application Service (ERAS) submissions were associated with multisource assessments of professionalism during internship. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: ERAS applications for all internal medicine interns (N=191) at Mayo Clinic entering training between July 1, 2005, and July 1, 2008, were reviewed by 6 raters. Extracted data included United States Medical Licensing Examination scores, medicine clerkship grades, class rank, Alpha Omega Alpha membership, advanced degrees, awards, volunteer activities, research experiences, first author publications, career choice, and red flags in performance evaluations. Medical school reputation was quantified using U.S. News & World Report rankings. Strength of comparative statements in recommendation letters (0 = no comparative statement, 1 = equal to peers, 2 = top 20%, 3 = top 10% or "best") were also recorded. Validated multisource professionalism scores (5-point scales) were obtained for each intern. Associations between application variables and professionalism scores were examined using linear regression. RESULTS: The mean ± SD (minimum-maximum) professionalism score was 4.09±0.31 (2.13-4.56). In multivariate analysis, professionalism scores were positively associated with mean strength of comparative statements in recommendation letters (β=0.13; P=.002). No other associations between ERAS application variables and professionalism scores were found. CONCLUSION: Comparative statements in recommendation letters for internal medicine residency applicants were associated with professionalism scores during internship. Other variables traditionally examined when selecting residents were not associated with professionalism. These findings suggest that faculty physicians' direct observations, as reflected in letters of recommendation, are useful indicators of what constitutes a best student. Residency selection committees should scrutinize applicants' letters for strongly favorable comparative statements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)197-202
Number of pages6
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume86
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

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Internship and Residency
Internal Medicine
Patient Selection
Career Choice
Professionalism
Licensure
Medical Schools
Publications
Volunteers
Linear Models
Multivariate Analysis
Medicine
Students
Physicians
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Cullen, M. W., Reed, D. A., Halvorsen, A. J., Wittich, C. M., Baumann Kreuziger, L. M., Keddis, M., ... Beckman, T. J. (2011). Selection criteria for internal medicine residency applicants and professionalism ratings during internship. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 86(3), 197-202. https://doi.org/10.4065/mcp.2010.0655

Selection criteria for internal medicine residency applicants and professionalism ratings during internship. / Cullen, Michael W.; Reed, Darcy A.; Halvorsen, Andrew J.; Wittich, Christopher M.; Baumann Kreuziger, Lisa M.; Keddis, Mira; Mcdonald, Furman S.; Beckman, Thomas J.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 86, No. 3, 01.01.2011, p. 197-202.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cullen, MW, Reed, DA, Halvorsen, AJ, Wittich, CM, Baumann Kreuziger, LM, Keddis, M, Mcdonald, FS & Beckman, TJ 2011, 'Selection criteria for internal medicine residency applicants and professionalism ratings during internship', Mayo Clinic Proceedings, vol. 86, no. 3, pp. 197-202. https://doi.org/10.4065/mcp.2010.0655
Cullen, Michael W. ; Reed, Darcy A. ; Halvorsen, Andrew J. ; Wittich, Christopher M. ; Baumann Kreuziger, Lisa M. ; Keddis, Mira ; Mcdonald, Furman S. ; Beckman, Thomas J. / Selection criteria for internal medicine residency applicants and professionalism ratings during internship. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2011 ; Vol. 86, No. 3. pp. 197-202.
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