Secondary abnormalities of chromosome 6q in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia

A sequential study of karyotypic instability in 51 patients

William G. Finn, Neil Elliot Kay, Steven H. Kroft, Stephanie Church, LoAnn C. Peterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although karyotypic abnormalities are well documented in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL), few sequential cytogenetic studies have been done. In this study, peripheral blood lymphocytes from fifty-one patients with B-CLL were sequentially karyotyped over a mean interval of 13.8 months (range, one to 51 months). Cytogenetic clones were detected in 33/51 patients (66%) on initial study, including 17 patients with structural abnormalities of chromosome 13q14, and three patients with trisomy 12. Karyotypic evolution was documented in 22/51 patients (43%). The most common secondarily acquired chromosome aberrations were structural abnormalities of the long arm of chromosome 6 involving the region of 6q21-q24 (six patients). Four patients each had acquired structural abnormalities of 1q, 3p, 12q, and 13q. Disease progression, as measured by advance in Rai stage or death from the disease, was observed more often in the clonal evolution group than in the karyotypically stable group (11/22 vs. 5/29; P = 0.017). Patients with secondary abnormalities of 6q had a significantly decreased progression-free survival interval compared with other patients in the study (P = .023). The authors conclude that clonal karyotypic evolution is common in B-CLL, and that clonal evolution correlates with clinical disease progression. Furthermore, the poor outcomes previously attributed to CLL with 6q abnormalities may be related to the clonal acquisition of these abnormalities over time. Future studies should focus on the relevant genetic events underlying the clinical progression observed with karyotypic evolution of B- CLL.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)223-229
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Hematology
Volume59
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1998
Externally publishedYes

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B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
Chromosome Aberrations
Clonal Evolution
Cytogenetics
Disease Progression
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 6
Trisomy
Disease-Free Survival
Clone Cells
Lymphocytes

Keywords

  • Chromosome 6
  • Chronic lymphocytic leukemia
  • Clonal evolution
  • Cytogenetics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hematology

Cite this

Secondary abnormalities of chromosome 6q in B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia : A sequential study of karyotypic instability in 51 patients. / Finn, William G.; Kay, Neil Elliot; Kroft, Steven H.; Church, Stephanie; Peterson, LoAnn C.

In: American Journal of Hematology, Vol. 59, No. 3, 11.1998, p. 223-229.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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