Screening for colorectal cancer in elderly persons: Who should we screen and when can we stop?

Shail Maheshwari, Tushar Patel, Parita Patel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of age on the potential benefits of screening for colorectal cancer. Method: Life-table analysis of the risks of dying from colorectal cancer or from all other causes was performed. The impact of prematurely stopping screening was compared to the maximal potential benefit expected from lifelong screening. Results: The relative proportion of deaths from colorectal cancer compared to all other causes was greatest at the age of 62 and diminished thereafter. A total of 80% of the maximal benefit from screening was achieved by screening till the age of 82. The impact of prematurely stopping screening varied with gender and race. Discussion: The maximal societal benefit will be achieved by screening at younger ages because of competing causes of mortality among older people. Gender and ethnicity should be considered in individual decisions to stop screening at a given age.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)126-139
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Aging and Health
Volume20
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2008

Keywords

  • Actuarial analysis
  • Age
  • Life expectancy
  • Life-table analysis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Screening for colorectal cancer in elderly persons: Who should we screen and when can we stop?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this