SCN5A allelic expression imbalance in African-Americans heterozygous for the common variant p.Ser1103Tyr

Stacy A S Killen, Jennifer Kunic, Lily Wang, Adele Lewis, Bruce P. Levy, Michael John Ackerman, Alfred L. George

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Heterozygous and homozygous carriers of SCN5A-p.Ser1103Tyr, a common genetic variant with functional effects among African-Americans, have an increased risk of sudden death. We hypothesized that some heterozygous carriers may have unequal expression of wild-type and variant alleles and secondarily that predominance of the variant gene copy could further increase risk for sudden death in this population.Methods: We quantified allele-specific expression of SCN5A-p.Ser1103Tyr by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in heart tissue from heterozygous African-American infants, who died from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) or from other causes, to test for allelic expression imbalance.Results: We observed significant allelic expression imbalance in 13 of 26 (50%) African-American infant hearts heterozygous for SCN5A-p.Ser1103Tyr, and a significant (p < 0.0001) bimodal distribution of log2 allelic expression ratios. However, there were no significant differences in the mean log2 allelic expression ratios in hearts of infants dying from SIDS as compared to infants dying from other causes and no significant difference in the proportion of cases with greater expression of the variant allele.Conclusions: Our data provide evidence that SCN5A allelic expression imbalance occurs in African-Americans heterozygous for p.Ser1103Tyr, but this phenomenon alone does not appear to be a marker for risk of SIDS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number74
JournalBMC Medical Genetics
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - May 14 2010

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Allelic Imbalance
African Americans
Sudden Infant Death
Alleles
Sudden Death
Reverse Transcription
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Population
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Genetics

Cite this

SCN5A allelic expression imbalance in African-Americans heterozygous for the common variant p.Ser1103Tyr. / Killen, Stacy A S; Kunic, Jennifer; Wang, Lily; Lewis, Adele; Levy, Bruce P.; Ackerman, Michael John; George, Alfred L.

In: BMC Medical Genetics, Vol. 11, No. 1, 74, 14.05.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Killen, Stacy A S ; Kunic, Jennifer ; Wang, Lily ; Lewis, Adele ; Levy, Bruce P. ; Ackerman, Michael John ; George, Alfred L. / SCN5A allelic expression imbalance in African-Americans heterozygous for the common variant p.Ser1103Tyr. In: BMC Medical Genetics. 2010 ; Vol. 11, No. 1.
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N2 - Background: Heterozygous and homozygous carriers of SCN5A-p.Ser1103Tyr, a common genetic variant with functional effects among African-Americans, have an increased risk of sudden death. We hypothesized that some heterozygous carriers may have unequal expression of wild-type and variant alleles and secondarily that predominance of the variant gene copy could further increase risk for sudden death in this population.Methods: We quantified allele-specific expression of SCN5A-p.Ser1103Tyr by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in heart tissue from heterozygous African-American infants, who died from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) or from other causes, to test for allelic expression imbalance.Results: We observed significant allelic expression imbalance in 13 of 26 (50%) African-American infant hearts heterozygous for SCN5A-p.Ser1103Tyr, and a significant (p < 0.0001) bimodal distribution of log2 allelic expression ratios. However, there were no significant differences in the mean log2 allelic expression ratios in hearts of infants dying from SIDS as compared to infants dying from other causes and no significant difference in the proportion of cases with greater expression of the variant allele.Conclusions: Our data provide evidence that SCN5A allelic expression imbalance occurs in African-Americans heterozygous for p.Ser1103Tyr, but this phenomenon alone does not appear to be a marker for risk of SIDS.

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