Rubella

Nathaniel Lambert, Peter Strebel, Walter Orenstein, Joseph Icenogle, Gregory A. Poland

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

68 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rubella remains an important pathogen worldwide, with roughly 100,000 cases of congenital rubella syndrome estimated to occur every year. Rubella-containing vaccine is highly effective and safe and, as a result, endemic rubella transmission has been interrupted in the Americas since 2009. Incomplete rubella vaccination programmes result in continued disease transmission, as evidenced by recent large outbreaks in Japan and elsewhere. In this Seminar, we provide present results regarding rubella control, elimination, and eradication policies, and a brief review of new laboratory diagnostics. Additionally, we provide novel information about rubella-containing vaccine immunogenetics and review the emerging evidence of interindividual variability in humoral and cell-mediated innate and adaptive immune responses to rubella-containing vaccine and their association with haplotypes and single-nucleotide polymorphisms across the human genome.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2297-2307
Number of pages11
JournalThe Lancet
Volume385
Issue number9984
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 6 2015

Fingerprint

Rubella
Rubella Vaccine
Congenital Rubella Syndrome
Immunogenetics
Adaptive Immunity
Human Genome
Innate Immunity
Haplotypes
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Disease Outbreaks
Japan
Vaccination

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Lambert, N., Strebel, P., Orenstein, W., Icenogle, J., & Poland, G. A. (2015). Rubella. The Lancet, 385(9984), 2297-2307. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(14)60539-0

Rubella. / Lambert, Nathaniel; Strebel, Peter; Orenstein, Walter; Icenogle, Joseph; Poland, Gregory A.

In: The Lancet, Vol. 385, No. 9984, 06.06.2015, p. 2297-2307.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lambert, N, Strebel, P, Orenstein, W, Icenogle, J & Poland, GA 2015, 'Rubella', The Lancet, vol. 385, no. 9984, pp. 2297-2307. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(14)60539-0
Lambert N, Strebel P, Orenstein W, Icenogle J, Poland GA. Rubella. The Lancet. 2015 Jun 6;385(9984):2297-2307. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(14)60539-0
Lambert, Nathaniel ; Strebel, Peter ; Orenstein, Walter ; Icenogle, Joseph ; Poland, Gregory A. / Rubella. In: The Lancet. 2015 ; Vol. 385, No. 9984. pp. 2297-2307.
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