Role of calcium intake in modulating age-related increases in parathyroid function and bone resorption

W. Roland Mckane, Sundeep Khosla, Kathleen S. Egan, Simon P. Robins, Mary F. Burritt, B. Lawrence Riggs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and bone resorption increase in elderly women and contribute to age-related bone loss. Whether these abnormalities are caused by calcium deficiency resulting from age-related decreases in absorption and renal conservation is unclear. We studied 28 normal elderly women (mean ± SD, age 69.3 ± 2.7 yr) who were maintained for 3 yr on usual calcium intake levels (20.4 ± 7.2 mmol/day [815 ± 289 mg/day]; n = 15) (known as the usual calcium group) or high calcium intake levels (60.4 ± 6.5 mmol/day [2414 ± 260 mg/day]; n = 13) (known as the high calcium group) and a reference group of 12 normal young adult women (age 30.1 ± 4.4 yr), whose calcium intake was 23.0 ± 4.8 mmol/day (918 ± 193 mg/day) (known as the young group). Serum PTH was measured every 2 h, and urinary excretion of deoxypyridinoline (Dpd), a new marker for bone resorption, was measured in 4 h collections. Parathyroid gland secretory capacity was assessed during induced hypocalcemia. The mean 24 h serum PTH was 40% lower (P < 0.001), and the mean 24 h urinary Dpd was 35% lower (P < 0.005) in the high than in the usual calcium group. Mean parathyroid gland secretory capacity also was 47% lower (P < 0.005) in the high calcium group than in the usual calcium group. However, the usual calcium group had a mean 24 h serum PTH level that was 70% higher (P < 0.001) and a mean 24 h urinary Dpd level that was 30% higher (P < 0.005) than the young group, whereas the high calcium group was indistinguishable from the young group. Thus, failure of elderly women to increase their calcium intake to offset age-related increases in calcium requirement contributes substantially to their development of increased parathyroid activity and increased bone resorption, whereas a high calcium intake can reverse both abnormalities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1699-1703
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume81
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1996

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Bone Resorption
Bone
Calcium
Parathyroid Hormone
Parathyroid Glands
Serum
Hypocalcemia
Osteoporosis
Young Adult
Conservation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Role of calcium intake in modulating age-related increases in parathyroid function and bone resorption. / Mckane, W. Roland; Khosla, Sundeep; Egan, Kathleen S.; Robins, Simon P.; Burritt, Mary F.; Riggs, B. Lawrence.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 81, No. 5, 1996, p. 1699-1703.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mckane, W. Roland ; Khosla, Sundeep ; Egan, Kathleen S. ; Robins, Simon P. ; Burritt, Mary F. ; Riggs, B. Lawrence. / Role of calcium intake in modulating age-related increases in parathyroid function and bone resorption. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 1996 ; Vol. 81, No. 5. pp. 1699-1703.
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abstract = "Serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and bone resorption increase in elderly women and contribute to age-related bone loss. Whether these abnormalities are caused by calcium deficiency resulting from age-related decreases in absorption and renal conservation is unclear. We studied 28 normal elderly women (mean ± SD, age 69.3 ± 2.7 yr) who were maintained for 3 yr on usual calcium intake levels (20.4 ± 7.2 mmol/day [815 ± 289 mg/day]; n = 15) (known as the usual calcium group) or high calcium intake levels (60.4 ± 6.5 mmol/day [2414 ± 260 mg/day]; n = 13) (known as the high calcium group) and a reference group of 12 normal young adult women (age 30.1 ± 4.4 yr), whose calcium intake was 23.0 ± 4.8 mmol/day (918 ± 193 mg/day) (known as the young group). Serum PTH was measured every 2 h, and urinary excretion of deoxypyridinoline (Dpd), a new marker for bone resorption, was measured in 4 h collections. Parathyroid gland secretory capacity was assessed during induced hypocalcemia. The mean 24 h serum PTH was 40{\%} lower (P < 0.001), and the mean 24 h urinary Dpd was 35{\%} lower (P < 0.005) in the high than in the usual calcium group. Mean parathyroid gland secretory capacity also was 47{\%} lower (P < 0.005) in the high calcium group than in the usual calcium group. However, the usual calcium group had a mean 24 h serum PTH level that was 70{\%} higher (P < 0.001) and a mean 24 h urinary Dpd level that was 30{\%} higher (P < 0.005) than the young group, whereas the high calcium group was indistinguishable from the young group. Thus, failure of elderly women to increase their calcium intake to offset age-related increases in calcium requirement contributes substantially to their development of increased parathyroid activity and increased bone resorption, whereas a high calcium intake can reverse both abnormalities.",
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AB - Serum parathyroid hormone (PTH) and bone resorption increase in elderly women and contribute to age-related bone loss. Whether these abnormalities are caused by calcium deficiency resulting from age-related decreases in absorption and renal conservation is unclear. We studied 28 normal elderly women (mean ± SD, age 69.3 ± 2.7 yr) who were maintained for 3 yr on usual calcium intake levels (20.4 ± 7.2 mmol/day [815 ± 289 mg/day]; n = 15) (known as the usual calcium group) or high calcium intake levels (60.4 ± 6.5 mmol/day [2414 ± 260 mg/day]; n = 13) (known as the high calcium group) and a reference group of 12 normal young adult women (age 30.1 ± 4.4 yr), whose calcium intake was 23.0 ± 4.8 mmol/day (918 ± 193 mg/day) (known as the young group). Serum PTH was measured every 2 h, and urinary excretion of deoxypyridinoline (Dpd), a new marker for bone resorption, was measured in 4 h collections. Parathyroid gland secretory capacity was assessed during induced hypocalcemia. The mean 24 h serum PTH was 40% lower (P < 0.001), and the mean 24 h urinary Dpd was 35% lower (P < 0.005) in the high than in the usual calcium group. Mean parathyroid gland secretory capacity also was 47% lower (P < 0.005) in the high calcium group than in the usual calcium group. However, the usual calcium group had a mean 24 h serum PTH level that was 70% higher (P < 0.001) and a mean 24 h urinary Dpd level that was 30% higher (P < 0.005) than the young group, whereas the high calcium group was indistinguishable from the young group. Thus, failure of elderly women to increase their calcium intake to offset age-related increases in calcium requirement contributes substantially to their development of increased parathyroid activity and increased bone resorption, whereas a high calcium intake can reverse both abnormalities.

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