Rheumatoid arthritis is associated with left ventricular concentric remodeling: Results of a population-based cross-sectional study

Elena Myasoedova, John Manley III Davis, Cynthia Crowson, Veronique Lee Roger, Barry L. Karon, Daniel Dean Borgeson, Terry M Therneau, Eric Lawrence Matteson, Richard J. Rodeheffer, Sherine E. Gabriel

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31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To study left ventricular (LV) geometry in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and no history of heart failure compared with that in subjects with neither RA nor a history of heart failure, and to determine the impact of RA on LV remodeling. Methods A cross-sectional, community-based study was conducted among adult (age ≥50 years) patients with RA and age- and sex-matched subjects with neither RA nor a history of heart failure. All participants underwent standard 2-dimensional Doppler echocardiography. LV geometry was classified into the following 4 categories based on relative wall thickness and sex-specific cutoffs for the LV mass index: concentric remodeling, concentric hypertrophy, eccentric hypertrophy, or normal geometry. Results Among 200 patients with RA and 600 age- and sex-matched subjects without RA, the mean age was 65 years, and 74% of the individuals in both cohorts were female. Compared with subjects without RA, patients with RA were significantly more likely to have abnormal LV geometry (odds ratio [OR] 1.44, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.03-2.00), even after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. Among subjects with abnormal LV geometry, the odds of concentric LV remodeling were significantly increased in patients with RA (OR 4.73, 95% CI 2.85-7.83). In linear regression analyses, the LV mass index appeared to be lower in patients with RA who were currently receiving corticosteroids (β ± SE -0.082 ± 0.027, P = 0.002), even after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. Conclusion RA was strongly associated with abnormal LV remodeling (particularly concentric LV remodeling) among RA patients without heart failure. This association remained significant after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. RA disease-related factors may promote changes in LV geometry. The biologic mechanisms underlying LV remodeling warrant further investigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1713-1718
Number of pages6
JournalArthritis and Rheumatism
Volume65
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2013

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Ventricular Remodeling
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Population
Heart Failure
Comorbidity
Hypertrophy
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Doppler Echocardiography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Rheumatology
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

@article{259fc404b36c49c5a336e83217170ac9,
title = "Rheumatoid arthritis is associated with left ventricular concentric remodeling: Results of a population-based cross-sectional study",
abstract = "Objective To study left ventricular (LV) geometry in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and no history of heart failure compared with that in subjects with neither RA nor a history of heart failure, and to determine the impact of RA on LV remodeling. Methods A cross-sectional, community-based study was conducted among adult (age ≥50 years) patients with RA and age- and sex-matched subjects with neither RA nor a history of heart failure. All participants underwent standard 2-dimensional Doppler echocardiography. LV geometry was classified into the following 4 categories based on relative wall thickness and sex-specific cutoffs for the LV mass index: concentric remodeling, concentric hypertrophy, eccentric hypertrophy, or normal geometry. Results Among 200 patients with RA and 600 age- and sex-matched subjects without RA, the mean age was 65 years, and 74{\%} of the individuals in both cohorts were female. Compared with subjects without RA, patients with RA were significantly more likely to have abnormal LV geometry (odds ratio [OR] 1.44, 95{\%} confidence interval [95{\%} CI] 1.03-2.00), even after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. Among subjects with abnormal LV geometry, the odds of concentric LV remodeling were significantly increased in patients with RA (OR 4.73, 95{\%} CI 2.85-7.83). In linear regression analyses, the LV mass index appeared to be lower in patients with RA who were currently receiving corticosteroids (β ± SE -0.082 ± 0.027, P = 0.002), even after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. Conclusion RA was strongly associated with abnormal LV remodeling (particularly concentric LV remodeling) among RA patients without heart failure. This association remained significant after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. RA disease-related factors may promote changes in LV geometry. The biologic mechanisms underlying LV remodeling warrant further investigation.",
author = "Elena Myasoedova and Davis, {John Manley III} and Cynthia Crowson and Roger, {Veronique Lee} and Karon, {Barry L.} and Borgeson, {Daniel Dean} and Therneau, {Terry M} and Matteson, {Eric Lawrence} and Rodeheffer, {Richard J.} and Gabriel, {Sherine E.}",
year = "2013",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1002/art.37949",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "65",
pages = "1713--1718",
journal = "Arthritis and Rheumatology",
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T1 - Rheumatoid arthritis is associated with left ventricular concentric remodeling

T2 - Results of a population-based cross-sectional study

AU - Myasoedova, Elena

AU - Davis, John Manley III

AU - Crowson, Cynthia

AU - Roger, Veronique Lee

AU - Karon, Barry L.

AU - Borgeson, Daniel Dean

AU - Therneau, Terry M

AU - Matteson, Eric Lawrence

AU - Rodeheffer, Richard J.

AU - Gabriel, Sherine E.

PY - 2013/7

Y1 - 2013/7

N2 - Objective To study left ventricular (LV) geometry in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and no history of heart failure compared with that in subjects with neither RA nor a history of heart failure, and to determine the impact of RA on LV remodeling. Methods A cross-sectional, community-based study was conducted among adult (age ≥50 years) patients with RA and age- and sex-matched subjects with neither RA nor a history of heart failure. All participants underwent standard 2-dimensional Doppler echocardiography. LV geometry was classified into the following 4 categories based on relative wall thickness and sex-specific cutoffs for the LV mass index: concentric remodeling, concentric hypertrophy, eccentric hypertrophy, or normal geometry. Results Among 200 patients with RA and 600 age- and sex-matched subjects without RA, the mean age was 65 years, and 74% of the individuals in both cohorts were female. Compared with subjects without RA, patients with RA were significantly more likely to have abnormal LV geometry (odds ratio [OR] 1.44, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.03-2.00), even after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. Among subjects with abnormal LV geometry, the odds of concentric LV remodeling were significantly increased in patients with RA (OR 4.73, 95% CI 2.85-7.83). In linear regression analyses, the LV mass index appeared to be lower in patients with RA who were currently receiving corticosteroids (β ± SE -0.082 ± 0.027, P = 0.002), even after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. Conclusion RA was strongly associated with abnormal LV remodeling (particularly concentric LV remodeling) among RA patients without heart failure. This association remained significant after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. RA disease-related factors may promote changes in LV geometry. The biologic mechanisms underlying LV remodeling warrant further investigation.

AB - Objective To study left ventricular (LV) geometry in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and no history of heart failure compared with that in subjects with neither RA nor a history of heart failure, and to determine the impact of RA on LV remodeling. Methods A cross-sectional, community-based study was conducted among adult (age ≥50 years) patients with RA and age- and sex-matched subjects with neither RA nor a history of heart failure. All participants underwent standard 2-dimensional Doppler echocardiography. LV geometry was classified into the following 4 categories based on relative wall thickness and sex-specific cutoffs for the LV mass index: concentric remodeling, concentric hypertrophy, eccentric hypertrophy, or normal geometry. Results Among 200 patients with RA and 600 age- and sex-matched subjects without RA, the mean age was 65 years, and 74% of the individuals in both cohorts were female. Compared with subjects without RA, patients with RA were significantly more likely to have abnormal LV geometry (odds ratio [OR] 1.44, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.03-2.00), even after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. Among subjects with abnormal LV geometry, the odds of concentric LV remodeling were significantly increased in patients with RA (OR 4.73, 95% CI 2.85-7.83). In linear regression analyses, the LV mass index appeared to be lower in patients with RA who were currently receiving corticosteroids (β ± SE -0.082 ± 0.027, P = 0.002), even after adjusting for cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. Conclusion RA was strongly associated with abnormal LV remodeling (particularly concentric LV remodeling) among RA patients without heart failure. This association remained significant after adjustment for cardiovascular risk factors and comorbidities. RA disease-related factors may promote changes in LV geometry. The biologic mechanisms underlying LV remodeling warrant further investigation.

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