Reversion from chronic migraine to episodic migraine following treatment with erenumab: Results of a post-hoc analysis of a randomized, 12-week, double-blind study and a 52-week, open-label extension

Richard B. Lipton, Stewart J. Tepper, Stephen D. Silberstein, David Kudrow, Messoud Ashina, Uwe Reuter, David W. Dodick, Feng Zhang, Gregory A. Rippon, Sunfa Cheng, Daniel D. Mikol

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1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To determine reversion rates from chronic migraine to episodic migraine during long-term erenumab treatment. Methods: A daily headache diary was completed during the 12-week, double-blind treatment phase of a placebo-controlled trial comparing erenumab 70 mg, 140 mg, and placebo, and weeks 1–12, 21–24, 37–40, and 49–52 of the open-label treatment phase. Chronic migraine to episodic migraine reversion rates were assessed over the double-blind treatment phase; persistent reversion to episodic migraine over 24 weeks (double-blind treatment phase through the first 12 weeks in the open-label treatment phase), long-term persistent reversion to episodic migraine over 64 weeks (double-blind treatment phase plus open-label treatment phase); delayed reversion to episodic migraine through the first 12 weeks of the open-label treatment phase among patients remaining in chronic migraine during the double-blind treatment phase. Results: In the double-blind treatment phase, 53.1% (95% confidence interval: 47.8–58.3) of 358 erenumab-treated completers had reversion to episodic migraine; monthly reversion rates to episodic migraine were typically higher among patients receiving 140 mg versus 70 mg. Among 181 completers (receiving erenumab for 64 weeks), 98 (54.1% [95% confidence interval: 46.6–61.6]) had reversion to episodic migraine during the double-blind treatment phase; of those, 96.9% (95% confidence interval: 91.3–99.4) had persistent reversion to episodic migraine, 96.8% (95% confidence interval: 91.1–99.3) of whom had long-term persistent reversion to episodic migraine. Delayed reversion to episodic migraine occurred in 36/83 (43.4% [95% confidence interval: 32.5–54.7]) patients; of these, 77.8% (95% confidence interval: 60.9–89.9) persisted in reversion through week 64. Conclusions: Patients with reversion to episodic migraine at week 12 will likely persist as episodic migraine with longer-term erenumab; others may achieve delayed reversion to episodic migraine. Clinical trial registration: URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT02066415

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6-16
Number of pages11
JournalCephalalgia
Volume41
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2021

Keywords

  • Calcitonin gene–related peptide receptor
  • erenumab
  • migraine prophylaxis
  • transformed migraine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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