Results of the American academy of neurology resident survey

W. D. Freeman, C. M. Nolte, B. R. Matthews, M. Coleman, J. R. Corboy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: To assess the effect of neurology residency education as trainees advance into independent practice, the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) elected to survey all graduating neurology residents at time of graduation and in 3-year cycles thereafter. Methods: A 22-question survey was sent to all neurology residents completing residency training in the United States in 2007. Results: Of 523 eligible residents, 285 (54.5%) responded. Of these, 92% reported good to excellent quality teaching of basic neurology from their faculty; however, 47% noted less than ideal training in basic neuroscience. Two-thirds indicated that the Residency In-service Training Examination was used only as a self-assessment tool, but reports of misuse were made by some residents. After residency, 78% entered fellowships (with 61% choosing a fellowship based on interactions with a mentor at their institution), whereas 20% entered practice directly. After adjustment for the proportion of residents who worked before the duty hour rules were implemented and after their implementation, more than half reported improvement in quality of life (87%), education (60%), and patient care (62%). The majority of international medical graduates reported wanting to stay in the United States to practice rather than return to their country of residence. Conclusions: Neurology residents are generally satisfied with training, and most entered a fellowship. Duty hour implementation may have improved resident quality of life, but reciprocal concerns were raised about impact on patient care and education. Despite the majority of international trainees wishing to stay in the United States, stricter immigration laws may limit their entry into the future neurology workforce.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNeurology
Volume76
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 29 2011

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Neurology
Internship and Residency
Patient Education
Patient Care
Quality of Life
Mentors
Emigration and Immigration
Neurosciences
Surveys and Questionnaires
Teaching
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Freeman, W. D., Nolte, C. M., Matthews, B. R., Coleman, M., & Corboy, J. R. (2011). Results of the American academy of neurology resident survey. Neurology, 76(13). https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0b013e318212a871

Results of the American academy of neurology resident survey. / Freeman, W. D.; Nolte, C. M.; Matthews, B. R.; Coleman, M.; Corboy, J. R.

In: Neurology, Vol. 76, No. 13, 29.03.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Freeman, WD, Nolte, CM, Matthews, BR, Coleman, M & Corboy, JR 2011, 'Results of the American academy of neurology resident survey', Neurology, vol. 76, no. 13. https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0b013e318212a871
Freeman WD, Nolte CM, Matthews BR, Coleman M, Corboy JR. Results of the American academy of neurology resident survey. Neurology. 2011 Mar 29;76(13). https://doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0b013e318212a871
Freeman, W. D. ; Nolte, C. M. ; Matthews, B. R. ; Coleman, M. ; Corboy, J. R. / Results of the American academy of neurology resident survey. In: Neurology. 2011 ; Vol. 76, No. 13.
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