Relationship between measures of central and general adiposity with aortic stiffness in the general population

Peter Wohlfahrt, Virend Somers, Renata Cifkova, Jan Filipovsky, Jitka Seidlerova, Alena Krajcoviechova, Ondrej Sochor, Iftikhar Jan Kullo, Francisco Lopez-Jimenez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Increased aortic stiffness may be one of the mechanisms by which obesity increases cardiovascular risk independently of traditional risk factors. While body mass index (BMI) is generally used to define excess adiposity, several studies have suggested that measures of central obesity may be better predictors of cardiovascular risk. However, data comparing the association between several measures of central and general obesity with aortic stiffness in the general population are inconclusive. Methods: In 1031 individuals (age 53±13 years, 45% men) without manifest cardiovascular disease randomly selected from population, we tested the association between parameters of central obesity (waist circumference - WC, waist-to-hip-ratio - WHR, waist-to-height ratio - WHtR) and general obesity (BMI) with carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (cfPWV). Results: In univariate analysis, WC and WHtR were more strongly associated with cfPWV than BMI in both genders, while WHR showed a stronger association with cfPWV only in women. WHtR was more closely associated with cfPVW than WHR. This difference between obesity measures remained after multivariate adjustment. When the fully adjusted hierarchical regression was used, among central obesity measures, WHtR had the largest additive value on top of BMI, while there was no additive value of BMI on top of WHtR. Conclusion: Central obesity parameters are more closely associated with aortic stiffness than BMI. Of central adiposity measures, WHtR has the strongest association with aortic stiffness beyond body mass index and cardiovascular risk factors. Our results suggest that WHtR may be the best anthropometric measure of excess adiposity in the general population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)625-631
Number of pages7
JournalAtherosclerosis
Volume235
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2015

Fingerprint

Vascular Stiffness
Adiposity
Abdominal Obesity
Body Mass Index
Pulse Wave Analysis
Population
Thigh
Obesity
Aortic Bodies
Waist-Hip Ratio
Waist Circumference
Cardiovascular Diseases

Keywords

  • Aortic stiffness
  • Body mass index
  • Obesity
  • Pulse wave velocity
  • Waist circumference
  • Waist-to-height ratio
  • Waist-to-hip ratio

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Relationship between measures of central and general adiposity with aortic stiffness in the general population. / Wohlfahrt, Peter; Somers, Virend; Cifkova, Renata; Filipovsky, Jan; Seidlerova, Jitka; Krajcoviechova, Alena; Sochor, Ondrej; Kullo, Iftikhar Jan; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco.

In: Atherosclerosis, Vol. 235, No. 2, 01.08.2015, p. 625-631.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wohlfahrt, Peter ; Somers, Virend ; Cifkova, Renata ; Filipovsky, Jan ; Seidlerova, Jitka ; Krajcoviechova, Alena ; Sochor, Ondrej ; Kullo, Iftikhar Jan ; Lopez-Jimenez, Francisco. / Relationship between measures of central and general adiposity with aortic stiffness in the general population. In: Atherosclerosis. 2015 ; Vol. 235, No. 2. pp. 625-631.
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