Relation of Preprocedural Statin Therapy to In-Hospital Procedural Complications Following Percutaneous Coronary Interventions in Patients With Hyperlipidemia

Mandeep Singh, Ryan J. Lennon, Veronique L. Roger, Charanjit S. Rihal, Sean Halligan, Amir Lerman, Eric Yang, David R. Holmes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Scopus citations

Abstract

We investigated whether the observed protective effect of hyperlipidemia is stronger in patients who take statins and, if so, whether that effect is likely due to patient characteristics associated with statin use. In-hospital complications and long-term outcomes of patients with hyperlipidemia (cholesterol level ≥240 mg/dl) undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) on statins (group Ia, n = 2,052) and not on statins (group Ib, n = 1,650) were compared with 726 patients with lower cholesterol levels (group II). Despite a higher prevalence of co-morbidities and worse angiographic characteristics in patients with hyperlipidemia, patients in group Ia had significantly lower in-hospital mortality (0% vs 2% in the other 2 groups, p <0.001), a lower increase in the postprocedure creatine kinase-MB fraction (14% vs 27% in group Ib and 28% in group II, p <0.001), and fewer PCI complications (15% vs 30% in groups Ib and II, p <0.001). After adjustment, patients in group Ia had a significant decrease in complications (odds ratio 0.72, 95% confidence interval 0.65 to 0.92, p = 0.009). In contrast, those in group Ib had outcomes similar to those of patients with lower cholesterol. After application of propensity analysis to adjust for the likelihood of receiving statins based on clinical, angiographic, and procedural characteristics, group Ia had fewer in-hospital complications (odds ratio 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.62 to 0.90, p = 0.002) and lower in-hospital mortality (odds ratio 0.32, 95% confidence interval 0.12 to 0.84, p = 0.021). After successful PCI, overall survival after dismissal and survival free of myocardial infarction and target vessel revascularization were similar. In conclusion, hyperlipidemia per se is not associated with lower in-hospital complications after PCI. The benefit is largely limited to patients on statin treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)325-330
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Cardiology
Volume98
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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