Rapid symptomatic and radiographic evolution after presumed spontaneous infarction of a meningioma

Derek R. Johnson, Timothy J Kaufmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Meningiomas are extremely common benign extra-axial brain tumors. When meningiomas present clinically, they typically cause subacute symptoms such as headache. Rarely, meningiomas become acutely symptomatic due to tumor necrosis, which may occur spontaneously or as a result of global hypoperfusion. Here, we describe an elderly man who experienced a rapid subacute decline after meningioma infarction. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging obtained in this case demonstrate the evolution of a benign-appearing meningioma into a ring-enhancing lesion with significant surrounding cerebral edema in <2 weeks. After the resection of a WHO grade 1 meningioma with central necrosis, the patient made a good clinical recovery.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)409-412
Number of pages4
JournalNeurologist
Volume18
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012

Fingerprint

Meningioma
Infarction
Necrosis
Brain Edema
Brain Neoplasms
Headache
Tomography
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • infarction
  • meningioma
  • MRI
  • necrosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Rapid symptomatic and radiographic evolution after presumed spontaneous infarction of a meningioma. / Johnson, Derek R.; Kaufmann, Timothy J.

In: Neurologist, Vol. 18, No. 6, 11.2012, p. 409-412.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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