Radiation injuries of the colon and rectum

D. P. Otchy, Heidi Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Approximately 5% to 10% of patients receiving abdominopelvic radiation therapy will develop a colon or rectal injury. Thorough evaluation of the patient to determine the extent of the injury and the presence of concomitant lesions and to rule out recurrent malignancy is urged. Many radiation complications can be managed with medical regimens. Although colostomy remains a valuable and frequently utilized mode of treatment, it is by no means the sole alternative when surgical intervention is required. Rectal resection with colorectal or coloanal anastomosis can be performed safely for some injuries involving the distal rectum. Surgery for irradiated bowel should be focused on minimizing dissection to minimize injuries and on providing healthy non-irradiated tissues to provide adequate blood supply to promote healing. Patients who have received abdominopelvic radiation are at greater risk of developing colorectal cancer, and cancer surveillance should be commenced 5 years after completion of therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1017-1035
Number of pages19
JournalSurgical Clinics of North America
Volume73
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1993

Fingerprint

Radiation Injuries
Rectum
Colon
Wounds and Injuries
Radiation
Colostomy
Dissection
Colorectal Neoplasms
Neoplasms
Radiotherapy
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Radiation injuries of the colon and rectum. / Otchy, D. P.; Nelson, Heidi.

In: Surgical Clinics of North America, Vol. 73, No. 5, 1993, p. 1017-1035.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Otchy, D. P. ; Nelson, Heidi. / Radiation injuries of the colon and rectum. In: Surgical Clinics of North America. 1993 ; Vol. 73, No. 5. pp. 1017-1035.
@article{2a300a1fdef041f4b0368f8d8a44cc03,
title = "Radiation injuries of the colon and rectum",
abstract = "Approximately 5{\%} to 10{\%} of patients receiving abdominopelvic radiation therapy will develop a colon or rectal injury. Thorough evaluation of the patient to determine the extent of the injury and the presence of concomitant lesions and to rule out recurrent malignancy is urged. Many radiation complications can be managed with medical regimens. Although colostomy remains a valuable and frequently utilized mode of treatment, it is by no means the sole alternative when surgical intervention is required. Rectal resection with colorectal or coloanal anastomosis can be performed safely for some injuries involving the distal rectum. Surgery for irradiated bowel should be focused on minimizing dissection to minimize injuries and on providing healthy non-irradiated tissues to provide adequate blood supply to promote healing. Patients who have received abdominopelvic radiation are at greater risk of developing colorectal cancer, and cancer surveillance should be commenced 5 years after completion of therapy.",
author = "Otchy, {D. P.} and Heidi Nelson",
year = "1993",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "73",
pages = "1017--1035",
journal = "Surgical Clinics of North America",
issn = "0039-6109",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Radiation injuries of the colon and rectum

AU - Otchy, D. P.

AU - Nelson, Heidi

PY - 1993

Y1 - 1993

N2 - Approximately 5% to 10% of patients receiving abdominopelvic radiation therapy will develop a colon or rectal injury. Thorough evaluation of the patient to determine the extent of the injury and the presence of concomitant lesions and to rule out recurrent malignancy is urged. Many radiation complications can be managed with medical regimens. Although colostomy remains a valuable and frequently utilized mode of treatment, it is by no means the sole alternative when surgical intervention is required. Rectal resection with colorectal or coloanal anastomosis can be performed safely for some injuries involving the distal rectum. Surgery for irradiated bowel should be focused on minimizing dissection to minimize injuries and on providing healthy non-irradiated tissues to provide adequate blood supply to promote healing. Patients who have received abdominopelvic radiation are at greater risk of developing colorectal cancer, and cancer surveillance should be commenced 5 years after completion of therapy.

AB - Approximately 5% to 10% of patients receiving abdominopelvic radiation therapy will develop a colon or rectal injury. Thorough evaluation of the patient to determine the extent of the injury and the presence of concomitant lesions and to rule out recurrent malignancy is urged. Many radiation complications can be managed with medical regimens. Although colostomy remains a valuable and frequently utilized mode of treatment, it is by no means the sole alternative when surgical intervention is required. Rectal resection with colorectal or coloanal anastomosis can be performed safely for some injuries involving the distal rectum. Surgery for irradiated bowel should be focused on minimizing dissection to minimize injuries and on providing healthy non-irradiated tissues to provide adequate blood supply to promote healing. Patients who have received abdominopelvic radiation are at greater risk of developing colorectal cancer, and cancer surveillance should be commenced 5 years after completion of therapy.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027380795&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027380795&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8378826

AN - SCOPUS:0027380795

VL - 73

SP - 1017

EP - 1035

JO - Surgical Clinics of North America

JF - Surgical Clinics of North America

SN - 0039-6109

IS - 5

ER -