Quantity and quality of mental activities and the risk of incident mild cognitive impairment

Janina Krell-Roesch, Jeremy A. Syrjanen, Maria Vassilaki, Mary Margaret Machulda, Michelle M Mielke, David S Knopman, Walter K Kremers, Ronald C. Petersen, Yonas Endale Geda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether timing, number, and frequency of mentally stimulating activities in midlife and late life are associated with the risk of incident mild cognitive impairment (MCI). METHODS: We conducted a prospective cohort study in the setting of the population-based Mayo Clinic Study of Aging in Olmsted County, Minnesota, including 2,000 individuals aged ≥70 years who were cognitively unimpaired at baseline and were followed for a median of 5.0 years. Participants completed a self-reported survey on timing, number, and frequency of engagement in 5 mentally stimulating activities (reading books, computer use, social activities, playing games, craft activities) at baseline. RESULTS: The risk of incident MCI was significantly reduced for participants who engaged in social activities (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval] 0.80 [0.64-0.99]) and playing games (0.80 [0.66-0.98]) in both late life and midlife combined. Using a computer was associated with a decreased risk regardless of timing (not late life but midlife: 0.52 [0.31-0.88]; late life but not midlife: 0.70 [0.56-0.88]; late life and midlife: 0.63 [0.51-0.79]). Craft activities were associated with a reduced risk of incident MCI only when carried out in late life but not midlife (0.58 [0.34-0.97]). Furthermore, engaging in a higher number of activities in late life was associated with a significantly reduced risk of incident MCI (any 2 activities: 0.72 [0.53-0.99], any 3: 0.55 [0.40-0.77], any 4: 0.44 [0.30-0.65], all 5: 0.57 [0.34-0.96]). CONCLUSION: Engaging in a higher number of mentally stimulating activities, particularly in late life, is associated with a decreased risk of MCI among community-dwelling older persons.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e548-e558
JournalNeurology
Volume93
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 6 2019

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Independent Living
Cognitive Dysfunction
Reading
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Confidence Intervals
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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Quantity and quality of mental activities and the risk of incident mild cognitive impairment. / Krell-Roesch, Janina; Syrjanen, Jeremy A.; Vassilaki, Maria; Machulda, Mary Margaret; Mielke, Michelle M; Knopman, David S; Kremers, Walter K; Petersen, Ronald C.; Geda, Yonas Endale.

In: Neurology, Vol. 93, No. 6, 06.08.2019, p. e548-e558.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether timing, number, and frequency of mentally stimulating activities in midlife and late life are associated with the risk of incident mild cognitive impairment (MCI). METHODS: We conducted a prospective cohort study in the setting of the population-based Mayo Clinic Study of Aging in Olmsted County, Minnesota, including 2,000 individuals aged ≥70 years who were cognitively unimpaired at baseline and were followed for a median of 5.0 years. Participants completed a self-reported survey on timing, number, and frequency of engagement in 5 mentally stimulating activities (reading books, computer use, social activities, playing games, craft activities) at baseline. RESULTS: The risk of incident MCI was significantly reduced for participants who engaged in social activities (hazard ratio [95{\%} confidence interval] 0.80 [0.64-0.99]) and playing games (0.80 [0.66-0.98]) in both late life and midlife combined. Using a computer was associated with a decreased risk regardless of timing (not late life but midlife: 0.52 [0.31-0.88]; late life but not midlife: 0.70 [0.56-0.88]; late life and midlife: 0.63 [0.51-0.79]). Craft activities were associated with a reduced risk of incident MCI only when carried out in late life but not midlife (0.58 [0.34-0.97]). Furthermore, engaging in a higher number of activities in late life was associated with a significantly reduced risk of incident MCI (any 2 activities: 0.72 [0.53-0.99], any 3: 0.55 [0.40-0.77], any 4: 0.44 [0.30-0.65], all 5: 0.57 [0.34-0.96]). CONCLUSION: Engaging in a higher number of mentally stimulating activities, particularly in late life, is associated with a decreased risk of MCI among community-dwelling older persons.",
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AU - Krell-Roesch, Janina

AU - Syrjanen, Jeremy A.

AU - Vassilaki, Maria

AU - Machulda, Mary Margaret

AU - Mielke, Michelle M

AU - Knopman, David S

AU - Kremers, Walter K

AU - Petersen, Ronald C.

AU - Geda, Yonas Endale

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AB - OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether timing, number, and frequency of mentally stimulating activities in midlife and late life are associated with the risk of incident mild cognitive impairment (MCI). METHODS: We conducted a prospective cohort study in the setting of the population-based Mayo Clinic Study of Aging in Olmsted County, Minnesota, including 2,000 individuals aged ≥70 years who were cognitively unimpaired at baseline and were followed for a median of 5.0 years. Participants completed a self-reported survey on timing, number, and frequency of engagement in 5 mentally stimulating activities (reading books, computer use, social activities, playing games, craft activities) at baseline. RESULTS: The risk of incident MCI was significantly reduced for participants who engaged in social activities (hazard ratio [95% confidence interval] 0.80 [0.64-0.99]) and playing games (0.80 [0.66-0.98]) in both late life and midlife combined. Using a computer was associated with a decreased risk regardless of timing (not late life but midlife: 0.52 [0.31-0.88]; late life but not midlife: 0.70 [0.56-0.88]; late life and midlife: 0.63 [0.51-0.79]). Craft activities were associated with a reduced risk of incident MCI only when carried out in late life but not midlife (0.58 [0.34-0.97]). Furthermore, engaging in a higher number of activities in late life was associated with a significantly reduced risk of incident MCI (any 2 activities: 0.72 [0.53-0.99], any 3: 0.55 [0.40-0.77], any 4: 0.44 [0.30-0.65], all 5: 0.57 [0.34-0.96]). CONCLUSION: Engaging in a higher number of mentally stimulating activities, particularly in late life, is associated with a decreased risk of MCI among community-dwelling older persons.

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