Pulsatile release patterns of luteinizing hormone and progesterone in relation to symptom onset in women with premenstrual syndrome

L. L. Lewis, E. M. Greenblatt, C. A. Rittenhouse, J. D. Veldhuis, R. B. Jaffe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

18 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: To explore the pulsatile-release characteristics of LH and P in women with premenstrual syndrome (PMS) compared with age-matched phase- matched controls. Design: Prospective, repeated measures, two-group study. Setting: Human volunteers in an academic research environment. Participants: Six women with rigorously defined prospectively determined PMS; six age- matched phase-matched controls. Main Outcome Measures: Frequency, amplitude, concentration, and coincident pulsatile release characteristics of LH and P at three symptom-related points of the luteal phase. Results: No significant between-group differences in frequency, amplitude, or concentration were found. In pooled data, significant coincident pulsing between LH and P was demonstrated. The length of time between LH and P pulses systematically increased across the luteal phase, a finding not previously reported. In the PMS group only, significant coincident pulsing occurred at an unexpected zero time lag on the symptom-onset sampling day. Conclusion: A progressively increasing coupling interval may reflect the gradual decline of the corpus luteum. Presence of a zero time lag between LH and P at symptom onset in women with PMS may indicate an aberrance in corpus luteum response to LH stimulation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)288-292
Number of pages5
JournalFertility and sterility
Volume64
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1995

Keywords

  • Premenstrual syndrome
  • luteinizing hormone
  • progesterone; coincident pulsatility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Reproductive Medicine
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Pulsatile release patterns of luteinizing hormone and progesterone in relation to symptom onset in women with premenstrual syndrome'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this