Psychogenic polydipsia and water intoxication-Concepts that have failed

W. V R Vieweg, J. J. David, W. T. Rowe, M. J. Peach, Johannes D Veldhuis, D. L. Kaiser, W. W. Spradlin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

48 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ten patients (8 men, 2 women; mean age 38.7 ± 8.1 years), 7 of whom had schizophrenic disorders and 3 of whom had bipolar disorder (manic-depressive illness), manifested psychosis, intermittent hyponatremia, and polydipsia (PIP syndrome). The relationship between serum sodium and urinary water excretion among the 10 PIP patients is described in detail. The success of lithium in improving serum sodium levels and in decreasing urinary water excretion among the three PIP patients with bipolar disorder and the failure of changes in urinary water excretion to explain changes in serum sodium levels among the 10 PIP patients argue against "psychogenesis" as the explanation for the polydipsia and excessive water intake as the sole explanation for hyponatremia or complications ascribed to water intoxication.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1308-1320
Number of pages13
JournalBiological Psychiatry
Volume20
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1985
Externally publishedYes

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Psychogenic Polydipsia
Water Intoxication
Polydipsia
Hyponatremia
Sodium
Bipolar Disorder
Water
Serum
Lithium
Psychotic Disorders
Drinking
Schizophrenia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biological Psychiatry

Cite this

Vieweg, W. V. R., David, J. J., Rowe, W. T., Peach, M. J., Veldhuis, J. D., Kaiser, D. L., & Spradlin, W. W. (1985). Psychogenic polydipsia and water intoxication-Concepts that have failed. Biological Psychiatry, 20(12), 1308-1320. https://doi.org/10.1016/0006-3223(85)90116-7

Psychogenic polydipsia and water intoxication-Concepts that have failed. / Vieweg, W. V R; David, J. J.; Rowe, W. T.; Peach, M. J.; Veldhuis, Johannes D; Kaiser, D. L.; Spradlin, W. W.

In: Biological Psychiatry, Vol. 20, No. 12, 1985, p. 1308-1320.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Vieweg, WVR, David, JJ, Rowe, WT, Peach, MJ, Veldhuis, JD, Kaiser, DL & Spradlin, WW 1985, 'Psychogenic polydipsia and water intoxication-Concepts that have failed', Biological Psychiatry, vol. 20, no. 12, pp. 1308-1320. https://doi.org/10.1016/0006-3223(85)90116-7
Vieweg WVR, David JJ, Rowe WT, Peach MJ, Veldhuis JD, Kaiser DL et al. Psychogenic polydipsia and water intoxication-Concepts that have failed. Biological Psychiatry. 1985;20(12):1308-1320. https://doi.org/10.1016/0006-3223(85)90116-7
Vieweg, W. V R ; David, J. J. ; Rowe, W. T. ; Peach, M. J. ; Veldhuis, Johannes D ; Kaiser, D. L. ; Spradlin, W. W. / Psychogenic polydipsia and water intoxication-Concepts that have failed. In: Biological Psychiatry. 1985 ; Vol. 20, No. 12. pp. 1308-1320.
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