Provider Perspectives on the Acceptability, Appropriateness, and Feasibility of Teleneonatology

Jennifer L. Fang, Rachel Umoren, Hilary Whyte, Jamie Limjoco, Abhishek Makkar, Rosanna Yankanah, Mike McCoy, Mark D. Lo, Christopher E. Colby, Jeph Herrin, Robert M Jacobson, Bart M. Demaerschalk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective We aimed to measure provider perspectives on the acceptability, appropriateness, and feasibility of teleneonatology in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) and community hospitals. Study Design Providers from five academic tertiary NICUs and 27 community hospitals were surveyed using validated implementation measures to assess the acceptability, appropriateness, and feasibility of teleneonatology. For each of the 12 statements, scale values ranged from 1 to 5 (1 = strongly disagree; 5 = strongly agree), with higher scores indicating greater positive perceptions. Survey results were summarized, and differences across respondents assessed using generalized linear models. Results The survey response rate was 56% (203/365). Respondents found teleneonatology to be acceptable, appropriate, and feasible. The percent of respondents who agreed with each of the twelve statements ranged from 88.6 to 99.0%, with mean scores of 4.4 to 4.7 and median scores of 4.0 to 5.0. There was no difference in the acceptability, appropriateness, and feasibility of teleneonatology when analyzed by professional role, years of experience in neonatal care, or years of teleneonatology experience. Respondents from Level I well newborn nurseries had greater positive perceptions of teleneonatology than those from Level II special care nurseries. Conclusion Providers in tertiary NICUs and community hospitals perceive teleneonatology to be highly acceptable, appropriate, and feasible for their practices. The wide acceptance by providers of all roles and levels of experience likely demonstrates a broad receptiveness to telemedicine as a tool to deliver neonatal care, particularly in rural communities where specialists are unavailable. Key Points Neonatal care providers perceive teleneonatology to be highly acceptable, appropriate, and feasible. Perceptions of teleneonatology do not differ based on professional role or years of experience. Perceptions of teleneonatology are especially high in smaller hospitals with well newborn nurseries.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican journal of perinatology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2021

Keywords

  • feasibility
  • implementation science
  • newborn
  • telemedicine
  • teleneonatology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Provider Perspectives on the Acceptability, Appropriateness, and Feasibility of Teleneonatology'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this