Prevalence of a physician-assigned diagnosis of prostatitis

The olmsted county study of urinary symptoms and health status among men

Rosebud O Roberts, Michael M. Lieber, Thomas Rhodes, Cynthia J. Girman, David G. Bostwick, Steven J. Jacobsen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

191 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. To describe the occurrence of a physician-assigned diagnosis of prostatitis in a community-based cohort. Methods. A sampling frame of all Olmsted County, Minnesota, male residents was used to randomly select a cohort of men between 40 and 79 years old by January 1, 1990, to participate in a longitudinal study of lower urinary tract symptoms. The 2115 participants (response rate 55%) completed a previously validated self- administered questionnaire that assessed the prevalence of lower urinary tract symptoms, including a history of prostatitis. Subsequently, all inpatient and outpatient community medical records of participants were reviewed retrospectively for a physician-assigned diagnosis of prostatitis from the date of initiation of the medical record through the date of the last follow-up. Results. The overall prevalence rate of a physician-assigned diagnosis of prostatitis was 9%. Men identified with the diagnosis of 'prostatitis' had symptoms of dysuria and frequency and rectal, perineal, suprapubic, and lower back pain. Among men with a previous diagnosis of prostatitis, the cumulative probability of subsequent episodes of prostatitis was much higher (20%, 38%, and 50% among men 40, 60, and 80 years old, respectively). Conclusions. These findings indicate that the community-based prevalence of a physician-assigned diagnosis of prostatitis is high, of similar magnitude to that of ischemic heart disease and diabetes. Furthermore, once a man has an initial episode of prostatitis, he is more likely to suffer chronic episodes than men without a diagnosis. Although the pathologic mechanisms underlying these diagnoses are not certain, these data provide a first step toward understanding how frequently the diagnosis occurs in the community.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)578-584
Number of pages7
JournalUrology
Volume51
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1998

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Prostatitis
Health Status
Physicians
Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms
Medical Records
Dysuria
Low Back Pain
Myocardial Ischemia
Longitudinal Studies
Inpatients
Outpatients

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Prevalence of a physician-assigned diagnosis of prostatitis : The olmsted county study of urinary symptoms and health status among men. / Roberts, Rosebud O; Lieber, Michael M.; Rhodes, Thomas; Girman, Cynthia J.; Bostwick, David G.; Jacobsen, Steven J.

In: Urology, Vol. 51, No. 4, 04.1998, p. 578-584.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Roberts, Rosebud O ; Lieber, Michael M. ; Rhodes, Thomas ; Girman, Cynthia J. ; Bostwick, David G. ; Jacobsen, Steven J. / Prevalence of a physician-assigned diagnosis of prostatitis : The olmsted county study of urinary symptoms and health status among men. In: Urology. 1998 ; Vol. 51, No. 4. pp. 578-584.
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